X

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Synonyms for X

to remove or invalidate by or as if by running a line through or wiping clean

Synonyms for X

the cardinal number that is the sum of nine and one

Related Words

the 24th letter of the Roman alphabet

street names for methylenedioxymethamphetamine

being one more than nine

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References in periodicals archive ?
After providing a CliffsNotes companion to X's biography in Chapter 1, Chapter 2 paints a picture of Oxford, Britain, and race that moves between 1870 and 1964.
Minaj's artwork for her single does not depict the truth of Malcolm X's legacy,'' Shabazz's statement said.
Wiley X's involvement in the NASCAR racing scene and sponsorship of these top drivers is about more than generating widespread exposure for its products through this globally popular, but uniquely American sport.
She said the confusion and uncertainty of whether Mrs X could be returned to the care home for palliative care resulted in her missing out on spending quality time with her mother in her final hours Ombudsman Peter Tyndall said: "In the absence of alternative evidence I must express my concern that when addressing Mrs X's nutritional, hygiene and safety needs, her care plan was ignored and Mrs X's wellbeing and choice were disregarded.
As well as big hands, you'll need a big wallet for the One X's EUR606 non-contract price.
Birmingham parking patrols strike seven X's in place of the plate number, whenever any car is found parked illegally without license plates or at meters that are no longer valid.
Draw lines between all of the X's, except the top two.
Camp argues that one should not regard X's confused sentences as either true or false.
I regret that Title X's important role in achieving these remarkable results was not communicated clearly in the Foster article.
A BIRMINGHAM film club will be screening a short film about Malcolm X's visit to the Midlands tonight.
On his side of 1976, however, Baldwin moved to Hollywood to demand Malcolm X's continued relevance.
Torn paper, archival cellophane tape and masking tape, pencil, crayon, graphite, watercolor, tempera, and acrylic abet this too, but nothing is so primary and inviolate as the x's and bars that score the surfaces of many horse pictures from the mid- to late '70s.
It is as much a look at basketball history as it is a study of X's and O's.