workingman

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Synonyms for workingman

Synonyms for workingman

References in periodicals archive ?
In an era when the homes of workingmen and their families were rarely more than tenement hovels, the appeal of the saloons and their comfortable sociability is obvious.
The workingmen of San Francisco in 1880 were generally unorganized but had families and roofs over their heads.
By 1901 the unions of the Building Trades Council were separate and distinct from other workingmen and unions in San Francisco.
These two books provide two views of workingmen in an era of struggle.
Workingmen should keep to their honorabl e social post as workers, able bodied breadwinners nurtured by wives and mothers dedicated to the craft of homemaking.
During our Civil War, Karl Marx (yes, that Karl Marx) wrote to Abraham Lincoln, saying that ``from the commencement of the titanic American strife the workingmen of Europe felt instinctively that the star-spangled banner carried the destiny of their class.
68) In San Francisco, Laura Kendrick spoke to the assembled July crowd and urged the workingmen to share their wages with their wives since the hardships of the Depression fell on wives and children with as much force.
In discussing the San Francisco labor and anti-Chinese movements, for example, Alexander Saxton argues that white workingmen and their leaders discovered a powerful organizing tool in the anti-Chinese crusade, but by distracting the nonskilled and the unemployed from any campaign for radical social reform, their racism undermined a more radical class consciousness.
To supplement the aid they gave, British workingmen founded organizations of their own, called friendly societies.
The other section is demographic and deals with the mortality and morbidity of workingmen during the mortality decline and the epidemiological transition.
The main requirement for membership in the New England Association of Farmers, Mechanics, and other Workingmen was a good moral character.
Ironically, workingmen were guilty of their own brand of paternalism; they viewed women and children as "dependent workers" who needed male protection.
Workingmen and evangelicals agreed on the importance of economic growth, democracy, education, and individual rights.