wild spinach


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Synonyms for wild spinach

European plant naturalized in North America

common weedy European plant introduced into North America

References in periodicals archive ?
Another, Amaranthus dubius, known as wild spinach in some regions, has spikes of green and white flowers, oval green leaves, and grows 2 to 3 feet tall.
Diana said after capture against overwhelming odds, Jim and a comrade survived a forced death march without food by snatching bits of wild spinach.
Aphis fabae on wild spinach via Aphidius colemani, Rawalpindi, 23-iii-07, 34 and 16; Islamabad, 26-iii-05, 24 and 8; Attock, 29-iii-08, 35 and 16; Khushab, 27-iii-07, 35 and 14.
Sometimes known as wild spinach but regarded by many as superior, lambsquarters has 309 milligrams of calcium per 100 grams of raw leaves and 11,600 international units (IU) of vitamin A plus thiamine, riboflavin and niacin.
With the vast riches of Piedmont just outside her door, the chef has no trouble finding fresh, exquisite ingredients for the menu she calls "modern-classical." "Piedmontese cuisine is one of the best in Italy, and to fall in love with these products is a thing that comes automatically." Valazza forages in the surrounding apine hills for treasures such as violets for sorbets, wild berries, nuts, sage, thyme and wild spinach. She also uses regional products like ricotta cheese, toma cheeses from the Ossola Valley, and proscuitto and bacon from local vendors.
Most typical of the region is its cheese culture: Fondue moitiemoitie, macaroni of the chalet (macaroni with double cream), soup of the chalet with wild spinach, cheese and double cream, the famous meringues and double cream--you can find them all in nearly every restaurant of the region.
Lamb's quarter (Cbenopodium album, also called wild spinach) is the probable choice-I've seen it at the farmers' market in Santa Fe--but regular spinach substitutes nicely Native pinones (Pinus edulis), or any market variety of pine nuts, make a dressy finish.