whipping

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Synonyms for whipping

Synonyms for whipping

a punishment dealt with blows or lashes

the act of defeating or the condition of being defeated

Synonyms for whipping

beating with a whip or strap or rope as a form of punishment

a sewing stitch passing over an edge diagonally

the act of overcoming or outdoing

Synonyms

smart and fashionable

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References in periodicals archive ?
Father Damaso and the parents return the whippings, and things are back to square one.
There is a long paragraph on whipping that is relevant today in the wake of another senseless death due to fraternity hazing.
Daily whipping does not educate but does the opposite, the schoolmaster laments:
Basically whipping punishment is of hadd in nature.
* That the accused has committed the offence deliberately and intentionally, he could be subjected to whipping punishment.
Whipping punishment in adultery offence is mentioned in both the Quran and the Sunnah.
Even though whipping punishment is originally of hadd in nature, the ulama' are of the opinion that it could also be a punishment in ta'zir offences (HashimMehat, 1991).
The whipping of Richard Moore was in many ways an unexceptional event in the context of Reconstruction.
Before engaging the narrative accounts of the whipping of Richard Moore, the event needs to be positioned briefly in local, state, and federal contexts.
(24) It was in this context, then, that the whipping of Richard Moore occurred.
She worked as a literate domestic slave in close contact with several masters and mistresses from whom she suffered whippings, beatings, and sexual abuse.
In the 1760s officials created the post of "jumper" for those masters who wanted someone else to do the whipping.
One particularly severe whipping, however, left Patsey less than "what she had been.
Deborah McDowell has astutely noted the scant critical attention afforded the whipping scenes in Frederick Douglass's autobiographical narratives.
For in addition to his powerlessness, McDowell points to the pleasure Douglass derives as "both witness [to] and participant" those whipping scenarios.