wage

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Synonyms for wage

Synonyms for wage

something justly deserved

to engage in (a war or campaign, for example)

Synonyms for wage

References in periodicals archive ?
(2010), 'Wageless Life, New Left Review, 66: 79-97.
Although wageless women do not count for much in the eyes of the state, unofficially a lot of ideological work goes into promoting certain roles that are then imposed on women to keep the status quo in place.
"You don't need a job to be a proletarian," Denning insists with a bluntness that is both insightful and myopic, "wageless life, not wage labour, is the starting point in understanding the free market." (5)
For all that Denning captures the fundamental importance of wagelessness, all the more so within a context of capitalism as crisis, his dichotomization of wageless life and waged labour is myopic.
(9) Such major destabilizing combinations of the waged and the wageless were a part of the eruptions of class struggle in Canada and the United States that repeatedly disturbed social order in 1877, 1886, 1894, 1919, and throughout the 1930s.
What all of this suggests is the necessity of seeing the waged and the wageless as part of a dispossessed class whole, one in which the obscured forms of resistance that have historically developed among the jobless demand consideration.
Cunnington has found the last three wageless months a nightmare but insists he is one of the lucky ones.
Try and run a "market economy" on a wageless basis!
As this union struggled, against all odds, to realize itself in the 1880s, evidence of how the lives of the waged and the wageless shaded into one another surfaced in many quarters.
In February 1891 two Toronto procession protests of the wageless also carried a black flag, this one emblazoned with the words "Work or Bread." Taking place on a Wednesday and a Thursday, the marches drew from 300-1000 unemployed workers.
The black flag that flew at demonstrations of the wageless in the late 19th century proclaimed the presence of the left among the unemployed.
PL calls for immediate post-revolutionary transition to wageless communism; it is a call with profound implications for how we organize at the present time.
If what we want--"unbroken community"--is identical to what we would be if our alienated condition were overcome--a universal, unbroken species being--then PL's line is ontologically justified and we should opt for a direct transition to a wageless communism.
The analogy which comes to mind is Pol Pot's Kampuchea--a moneyless (and therefore wageless) society, the towns emptied, great numbers of people displaced and levelled into a mass.
None of this slavery was chattel slavery, mass slavery, plantation slavery: rather it did take the form of what may perhaps be called "wageless labor,| coerced, but in no way subject to any kind of "market law."[2]