vindicate

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Synonyms for vindicate

Synonyms for vindicate

to free from a charge or imputation of guilt

to support against arguments, attack, or criticism

to show to be just, right, or valid

to defend, maintain, or insist on the recognition of (one's rights, for example)

Synonyms

to exact revenge for or from

Synonyms for vindicate

show to be right by providing justification or proof

maintain, uphold, or defend

Related Words

clear of accusation, blame, suspicion, or doubt with supporting proof

References in periodicals archive ?
I'm not suggesting here that democratic ways are universally vindicable. Let's just say what we take to be more or less 'just' enjoys an overlapping consensus and this view is supported by reasons that make it seem authoritative (such as proceeding from agreements of our leaders).
If the concrete injury requirement has the separation-of-powers significance we have always said, the answer must be obvious: To permit Congress to convert the undifferentiated public interest in executive officers' compliance with the law into an 'individual right' vindicable in the courts is to permit Congress to transfer from the President to the courts the Chief Executive's most important constitutional duty, to 'take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed,' Art.
to permit Congress to convert the undifferentiated public interest in executive officers' compliance with the law into an "individual right" vindicable in the courts is to permit Congress to transfer from the President to the courts the chief executive's most important constitutional duty, to "take care that the Laws be faithfully executed," Art.
The Court rejected Congress's attempt in the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to convert an undifferentiated public interest in the executive branch's compliance with ESA procedures into an individual right vindicable in the courts.
The current paradigm shift enables a move away from a purely political discourse of state interests vindicable in collective exercises of self-determination, to legalist rhetoric of rights vindicable in courts of law.
It is intuitively reasonable to require that, in this sense, one's beliefs be vindicable if one is to be justified in holding them; it should be possible to show not simply conditionally that beliefs of a certain kind may be justified if something else is justified, but that they are justified.