versicle


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a short verse said or sung by a priest or minister in public worship and followed by a response from the congregation

References in periodicals archive ?
It includes all five antiphons for vespers, followed by a versicle and response, a prayer, and then all five antiphons for lauds for each saint.
He surmised on the basis of internal evidence that Smart intended to write matching pairs of verses, the first all beginning with the versicle "Let," the Companion verses with the responsive "For.
In the first 'estempida', lines 13-14 of each stanza in Riquier's edition need to be combined to make a line of seven syllables with an internal rhyme so that the first versicle of section C comprises lines 13-15 of the text and the second versicle lines 16-17.
v] Hymn, versicle, and response of St Etheldreda; antiphons of Sts John the Baptist, Peter and Paul; prayers to the Holy Trinity.
Antiphon Versicle & Prayer foretell the Virg ins roll in the s cheme of Things
It was an aggregation of short stanzas (versicles), typically couplets, each line of which was sung to the same music and each versicle having its own music.
When he [archbishop Giulio] had arrived at the marble stone placed as a marker where the blessed Zenobius, Florentine bishop, wonderfully roused and revived a dead boy, after the Versicle Ora pro nobis Beate Zenobi had been sung by the priest and after the Response Ut digni efficiamurpromissionibus Christi, the Most Reverend Archbishop similarly sang and, singing, said the prayer of Saint Zenobius, and afterward proceeded as far as the angolo de' Pazzi and there, turning toward the cathedral, he arrived at the aforementioned Florentine cathedral church.
92-103); Linda Sexson, 'Nature's Old Tunic and the Erotic Sudarium: A Versicle on the Text and Texture of Medievalism', a retelling of, and curiously lyrical reflection on, the 'Sponsa Christi' (pp.
At some point in the Middle Ages, however, it became customary (at least in some places) to sing `Deo dicamus gratias', which has the same number of syllables and places the `dicamus' unit at the same point as in the versicle.
Most were sung during memorials consisting of an antiphon, versicle, response and prayer, but their texts show some diversity.
Johann Pachelbel: Samtliche Vokalwerke will include single volumes devoted to Mass settings, motets, and arias; two volumes with settings of the Vespers Ingressus (consisting of the versicle "Dens in adjutorium meum intende," the response "Domine, ad adjuvandum me festina," the "Gloria Patri," and a concluding "Alleluia"); and three volumes apiece for Magnificat settings and sacred concertos.
This formula was repeated three times at specified stations; after the procession had re-entered the basilica and reached the Sepulchre, the cappella sang |Cum autem venisset ad locum', after which the Sepulchre was sealed by the imprint of the doge's ring; at this point the cappella sang the versicle |Sepulto Domino signatum est monumentum'.
The original publication includes the chant for the Benedicamus (all in black stemless breves), reproduced in facsimile in the edition, which has both the versicle text "Benedicamus Domino" and the response text "Deo gratias.
The performance by the Gabrieli Consort and Players begins with the sacristy bell and then runs through the musical parts of such a service, including an organ intonation, the introductory versicle and response, plainchant antiphons from the rite of St Mark's, interpolated motets and instrumental pieces by Alessandro Grandi, Adriano Banchieri, Giacomo Finetti and Biagio Marini, with additional motets and instrumental music after the Benedicamus Domino by Monteverdi, Giovanni Battista Fasolo and Giovanni Antonio Rigatti.
Additional acrostics include a double acrostic involving the initial and second letter of each versicle (these letters are duplicated in the margin) and an abecedarium (fol.