vagrant


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Synonyms for vagrant

Synonyms for vagrant

leading the life of a person without a fixed domicile; moving from place to place

Synonyms for vagrant

a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of support

continually changing especially as from one abode or occupation to another

References in periodicals archive ?
Apparently, vagrants appear to be care-free despite their poverty, however, they lead a harsh life which is bound to sadden people once they learn more about them.
Finally, Fedora 22 Workstation developers received extra developer assistance with the addition of the Vagrant developer environment software into Fedora.
These out of place birds commonly are referred to as vagrants, and they come to North America in a variety of ways-following misguided migration paths, cast upon our continent like Dorothy by hurricane winds, or, in some cases, as stowaways on ships.
The first of the two novels, The Vagrant, will be published in hardback in spring 2015.
LUXURIOUS: The Vagrant in Funchal, Madeira Picture: COLIN LANE
An animal who made the reverse trip to Vagrant and company was Bouchamel, a greyhound who was beaten in the first round of a coursing stake at the Sutherland Meeting, near Dornoch, in November 1840.
Evidence is cited indicating that Beard's vagrant germ cells are what we now know as stem cells.
The blind vagrant "was positioned in the traditional 'Jesus' spot and called, very appropriately, 'Jesus'" (Kozlovic 155).
POLICE yesterday dismissed reports that they were hunting a "wolfman" vagrant over a mini-crimewave.
Their topics include the neglected soldier as vagrant, revenger, tyrant slayer in early modern England; famine, poverty, and welfare in India under colonial rule; official responses to beggars and vagrants in 19th-century Rio de Janeiro; disciplinary modernism in tsarist Russia; vagrancy and colonial control in British East Africa; imposing vagrancy legislation in contemporary Papua New Guinea; and doing homeless in Tokyo's Ueno Park.
Twenty years later, a vagrant sleeping rough on the streets of Leeds, he became the target of a sustained campaign of police brutality and was drowned in suspicious circumstances in the River Aire in the spring of 1969.
A VAGRANT was forced to spend the night in the freezing cold after the shelter he had made himself was burned down.
FIREFIGHTERS were called to tackle a blaze at a derelict building in Birmingham where it was feared a vagrant was trapped inside.
For the Irish, preserving the road as a domain of white men was one of these key privileges, even if it confirmed among elites that the Irish were a race apart, sharing the same vagrant characteristics as African Americans."
Cockburn used Harman alongside records of court assizes as valid sources of historical information on "vagrant criminals and their methods" (Crime in England, 1550-1800, 62-63).