unwelcomeness


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Synonyms for unwelcomeness

lack of cordiality and hospitableness

References in periodicals archive ?
Ho, Not Quite Rights: How the Unwelcomeness Element in Sexual Harassment Law Undermines Title V11's Transformative Potential, 20 YALE J.
The stress associated with these conditions and unwelcomeness can be harrowing, overwhelming, and sometimes lead to their early exit from the institutions and the professoriate altogether thus limiting opportunities for preservice teachers as well as White faculty to develop broadened and diverse perspectives.
Buster's unwelcomeness at the table is, of course, predicated upon a mistake, however, and has nothing whatsoever to do with class or ethnicity.
Vinson, the Court had ruled that the primary factor in sexual harassment is unwelcomeness, not consent.
Business magazines have long advised that "sexual bantering" and "suggestive remarks" should be stamped out, with no reference to severity, pervasiveness, or even unwelcomeness.
The last sentence is not wholly accurate, as with young victims or even somewhat older ones who are preyed upon by teachers, unwelcomeness is not dispositive of sexual harassment vel non.
The notion of outrage directs the mind only to grossness, and possibly also to unwelcomeness.
1993) (posing for a nude magazine outside work hours is irrelevant to issue of unwelcomeness of sexual advances at work)).
177) Moreover, male jurors often do not understand what is a sufficient indication of unwelcomeness.
The statutory framework here is clear: sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances and consent negates unwelcomeness.
The only exceptionable entry in this catalog is the question about unwelcomeness.
The Court specifically addressed how the plaintiff's dress might play a role in its newly-created unwelcomeness analysis.
For example, feminists have long argued for the elimination of the unwelcomeness requirement.
For criticisms of the unwelcomeness requirement, see Susan Estrich, Sex At Work, 43 STAN.