unmannerly


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Synonyms for unmannerly

Synonyms for unmannerly

socially incorrect in behavior

References in periodicals archive ?
When employees effectively equate their executives with the entity, they might regard unmannerly guidance not simply as atypical conduct by a certain person but as conduct characterizing their link with the organization.
Chapter six explores the fourth and last characterization, "the scheming scumbag." The second most prominent of the four Jewish American racializations, "the scheming scumbag" is often male, "conniving, excessively stubborn, cheating, win-at-all costs competitive, overly hard-bargain-driving, garish, and unmannerly" (114).
26) The common proverb remember yet oft, better to be unfed, than unmannerly taught.
Duncan, then Minister of Mobilization, is purported to have said that the school was too sanitized, implying, depending on one's interpretation, that he was either condescending to Jamaican working people, hostile and unmannerly to the German government, or simply gauche.
(116) One traditionally-minded European visiting Burma in the 1890s went further, describing emancipated British women as the "shrieking, lecturing, struggling, unmannerly female, this terrible product of the nineteenth century." (117)
There the murderers, Steeped in the colours of their trade; their daggers Unmannerly breeched with gore.
The moral was that Jews were "just like everyone else." "Undoubtedly there are miserly Jews, dishonest Jews, unmannerly Jews--Jews are people," Stegner wrote.
"They thought that he was rude, he was unmannerly, he was arrogant and they suspected he might be unfaithful to her," says historian Piers Brendon.
Historian Piers Brendon says: "They thought that he was rude, he was unmannerly, he was arrogant and they suspected he DRAMA going to take it up with the leader of the free world.
Noise making, unmannerly attitude and navigating actions
Any differences between cultural tendencies in a democratic or constitutionalist polity obviously depend on how one defines these terms in the first place, and I had some disagreement with Finn's understanding of democracy as majoritarianism, but in his hands the concept of "civility" is recurrently helpful, especially in his willingness to characterize dissident, rule-breaking, or unmannerly behavior as "civil" if it nevertheless seeks cultural accountability to constitutional commitments (p.
But this is no ordinary review of historical (or even Biblical) fact alone: one of the delights of O'Brien's analysis is his attention to giving a different 'spin' to history: one more reasoned and analytical than most: "Gregory I had benefitted from the "Invasioni Barbariche." While the word "barbarian" has had the fairly neutral meaning of "foreigner" in many European languages, it also includes such clearly pejorative descriptives as uncivilized, cruel, rude, uncouth, unmannerly and brutal.
In 1530 Erasmus, the famed Dutch philosopher, thought it "was unmannerly to suck back saliva as equally as are those whom we see spitting at every third word not from necessity but from habit.''
Compressed Air System: The unmannerly use of this equipment can also lead to an accident.
In an 1856 essay on the first three volumes of Ruskin's Modern Painters and his 1855 "Academy Notes," Eastlake characterizes Ruskin's work as showcasing "active thought, brilliant style, wrong reasoning, false statement, and unmannerly language" ("Modern Painters" 387).