unfulfilled

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  • adj

Synonyms for unfulfilled

of persons

References in periodicals archive ?
class="MsoNormalThis study was in sharp contrast to a related survey which found out that women stay in unhappy and unfulfilling relationships because the pool of eligible partners they can go for is not appealing.
They will not hesitate to resign and look for a better workplace if they find their current work unfulfilling.
This book is not for everyone, some may find the ending a bit unfulfilling. For those readers who like a taut, suspenseful thriller, however, this is a winner.--Debbie Wenk.
Yale's pursuit of a career-making donation of French art from an unlikely donor and the slow passage of the virus through his circle of friends overshadow the bumpy path of Fiona's frantic, unfulfilling life.
Despite an unfulfilling two-and-a-half years with United, Moutha-Sebtaoui made two penalty saves in the November 2016 draw with Liverpool U18s and started last season's FA Youth Cup defeat to Southampton at Old Trafford.
16), he talks about how he quit an unfulfilling corporate job and decided to complete marathons in all 59 national parks.
Rankin returned to his national side last year after a brief and unfulfilling switch to England, which culminated in a single Test appearance against Australia.
biological dad, William (Ron Cephas Jones); the obese Kate (Chrissy Metz) decides to lose weight; and sitcom actor Kevin (Justin Hartley) opts to quit his unfulfilling job.
But he said it was ultimately unfulfilling. "I had to have feeling," he said.
Q My friends and I talk about how much we'd love to leave our unfulfilling jobs.
Conte reckons there is a duty to entertain, admitting some victories earlier in his career have been unfulfilling.
Certainly better than anything Martin or Glazkov showed in two-and-a-half unfulfilling rounds.
A new study by Sauder School of Business Professor Izak Benbasat and his collaborators shows that envy is a key motivator behind Facebook posts and that contributes to a decrease in mental well-being among users.Creating a vicious cycle of jealousy and self-importance, the researchers say Facebook leads users to feel their lives are unfulfilling by comparison, and react by creating posts that portray their best selves.
"Just having a lot of zeros in the bank is nice for a little while, then it's unfulfilling. It's not how many zeros you have, it's actually what you do with them that marks you out."