unclear

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Related to unclearly: implicative
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  • adj

Synonyms for unclear

Synonyms for unclear

Synonyms for unclear

poorly stated or described

Synonyms

not easily deciphered

References in periodicals archive ?
Because the povlg1-positive cells in the acini of 4-mo-old juvenile pearl oysters had a nucleus that was weakly and unclearly stained with hematoxylin (Fig.
The proliferated connective tissue was partly and unclearly separated from the surrounding liver parenchyma which had appropriate histomorphological characteristics.
The Russian word for "German" is nemets--which means a person who speaks unclearly, unintelligibly, like a mute person.
Some recent research and commentary puts the blame directly at the feet of advisors who communicate incompletely or unclearly.
The unclearly defined terms and harsh punishments would allow for a wide interpretation of the law under which the right of freedom of the media can be limited.
they are unclearly expressed in content and structure.
This is particularly the case when (as here) the omissions and additions are signaled unclearly or inconsistently--or indeed not at all.
The main reasons of failures include the absence of management of cooperation activities, unclearly stated plan, improperly divided competitions and at last, but not least, the absence of corporate strategy intended to form and develop cooperation.
Another enhancement of note: The region segmentation algorithm can now classify regions even more accurately, reducing tedious region editing work, such as merging or splitting regions that are separated unclearly.
However, what these keywords refer to remain unclearly defined.
For example, Article 59 of the draft law criminalises activities that are "conducted by political parties" or those "that violate national sovereignty", which many in civil society fear as unclearly defined.
Bails and Tieslau argue, somewhat unclearly, that TELs at the state and local level are consistent with "the assumption that state and local governments are more responsive to the needs of the citizenry.
Between the two poles of the continuum are "most Canadian academics, pundits, and politicians" - exemplified in the table by Peter Hogg, Andrew Coyne, and Graham Fox - who believe a governor general "democratically could refuse dissolution only under certain circumstances" (with those circumstances varying among authorities and generally being unclearly defined).
128) Entangled in this provision, however, is the reality that what constitutes an "appropriate" education is ambiguous and unclearly defined.
If Student stated her argument unclearly, she cannot plausibly claim that Professor got it wrong.