true bill


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Related to true bill: No bill
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Words related to true bill

an indictment endorsed by a grand jury

References in periodicals archive ?
A true bill, for those unfamiliar with the term, is the grand jury's "verdict" and indicates that a majority of grand jurors believe that there is probable cause to support the proposed charge(s).
Professor Bowman devotes substantial attention to the Missouri requirement that a "true bill" be signed by the prosecutor before it becomes a valid indictment.
No state, court justice, senator, representative, no president can impel the people to separate from laws established within the true Bill of Rights or histories dearly bound to that Declaration.
Indictment; True Bill. A "true bill" is a charge brought by the grand jury accusing a person of a crime.
and Saviour Jesus Christ." (93) The jury returned a true bill, but
Privately printed in 1861 and long out of print until The True Bill Press under the editorship of Ben Wynne has newly published this 176-page annotated edition, "'The Personal Observations of a Man of Intelligence': Notes of a Tour in North America in 1861" is a record Scottish Conservative and landed aristocrat Sir James Fergusson made while on a three-month tour of the United States and Canada from August through October of that year.
But the National Audit Office watchdog reckons the true bill is twice that.
It is true Bill Clinton's presidency began with some rhetorical flourishes about spreading democracy.
The true bill forthe police crackdown on anti-war protester Brian Haw in Parliament Square last year exceeded pounds 111,000, new figures revealed yesterday.
The figure of pounds 431million, though widely quoted, was never the true bill but only a final estimate.
The opposition Labour group claims the true bill has been grossly under-estimated because it does not include the time of officers.
A huge minority in the country warned him the war was not a true bill. But Tony Blair was fired with the missionary's zeal.
On April 18, 2000, a grand jury that heard some 50 witnesses, including me, returned a verdict of "no true bill," exonerating the officers.
So well have we learned that particular lesson that sometimes we grow up to be reporters and editors who can decipher a city budget and tell you the difference between an indictment and a true bill, but can't name the world's most popular religions or even identify the major denominations in our own states.
When the inquiry concludes, the grand jury hands down a true bill or a no bill.