trochaic


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Related to trochaic: spondaic
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Words related to trochaic

of or consisting of trochees

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27) Hopkins was particularly attentive to the prosodic repercussions of trochaic substitutions, often using this reversal of feet mimetically and in puns.
The rhythmic alternation follows from the fact that the phonological foot of Greek is the moraic trochee ([Phi]), the moras of which are always realized with trochaic prominence -- one heavy syllable (the first mora of which is prominent, cf.
Furthermore, all meters can be scanned as iambic if you take enough trouble, making notions of anapestic, trochaic, dactylic, amphibrachic, or other meters unnecessary.
This is my right-handed prejudice for rising over falling feet as the default expectation in English metrics; for iambic and anapestic meters, that is, over trochaic and dactylic ones.
Written in sextains (rhyming abbaab), the poem inserts into its iambic lines a number of trochaic inversions that unsettle the poetic voice.
MA-nna-HA-tta as trochaic dimeter leans forward like wind-blown grass,
A slight trochaic miscarriage of the keyword "just" in the third line whispers that Harry's untheorized testimony may not only fall short of but actually trample on the truth he is so impatient to deliver.
This characterizes loan words of BJAN as having a trochaic foot, and differentiates it from Wadi Ramm Arabic (Mashaqba 2015) which is classified as an iambic dialect.
6) Throughout its 488 trochaic verses in ottava rima we find frequent references to the ruins of ancient Rome, which serve us today as a mirror of history: "Stadt der Trummer
There is, too, the use of trochaic rhythm in, for example, a line such as "Straddled, exile always in one Whitbread Ale town" (Pinter, Various Voices 119-20).
iambic, trochaic, and so forth) and demonstrates an expert familiarity with the poetic texts.
The third lines have feminine endings, so they are clearly trochaic.
Prufrock's Pervigilium" gains its title from the Pervigilium Veneris, which the Oxford Companion to Classical Literature describes as "a poem preserved in the Latin Anthology written in trochaic tetrameters, ninety-three lines long.
their metrical form--usually employing iambic or trochaic trimeter or