transmigrate

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Synonyms for transmigrate

to leave one's native land and settle in another

to change habitat seasonally

Synonyms

Synonyms for transmigrate

be born anew in another body after death

move from one country or region to another and settle there

References in periodicals archive ?
This increased mean age could be attributed to a greater path travelled as well as median palatine barrier that has to be crossed by maxillary canine to transmigrate as compared to relatively easier path for mandibular canine.
Thus a higher angulation (approximately 80[degrees]) as compared to mandibular canine might be required for an impacted maxillary canine to overcome strong anatomical barrier of median palatine suture and hence a horizontal position is more likely to transmigrate as compared to a mesioangular position.
Manusara does not tell us why Brahmadeva chose to transmigrate from the Brahmaloka heaven to be reborn as a counsellor in the lineage of Mahasammata, nor anything much that can help us identify him with further specificity.
Such a conception of karma and its impacts presuppose a notion of soul, which is eternal and which transmigrates.
10) Once Sarrasine dies, Zambinella transmigrates into diversified sign systems to elicit variegated desires.
It is apparent that for Barthes one should not concentrate on one art form but must set the body free to transmigrate among heterogeneous sign systems so as to play with the plurality of the text.
Antony: "It is shaped, sir, like itself; and it is as broad as it has breadth: it is just so high as it is, and moves with its own organs: it lives by that which nourisheth it; and the elements once out of it, it transmigrates.
the idea of the pre-existence of human soul which transmigrates across individual lives, though it is also fundamentally different from that in ways I shall indicate.
The spirit transmigrates, and, far from losing its principle of life by the change of its appearance, it is renovated in its new organs with a fresh vigor of a juvenile activity.
It is shaped, sir, like itself; and it is as broad as it hath breadth; it is just so high as it is, and moves with its own organs; it lives by that which nourisheth it; and, the elements once out of it, it transmigrates.
It lives by that which nourisheth it, and the elements once out of it, it transmigrates.