blame

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Synonyms for blame

hold responsible

attribute to

Synonyms

  • attribute to
  • credit to
  • assign to
  • put down to
  • ascribe to
  • impute to

Synonyms for blame

to find fault with

to ascribe (a misdeed or an error, for example) to

responsibility for an error or crime

Synonyms for blame

an accusation that you are responsible for some lapse or misdeed

a reproach for some lapse or misdeed

Synonyms

Related Words

put or pin the blame on

Synonyms

Related Words

harass with constant criticism

attribute responsibility to

expletives used informally as intensifiers

References in periodicals archive ?
Although half of Americans think Obama is at least moderately to blame for current economic problems, they blame Bush more.
If the moral standing to blame were like legal standing in this way, then the father would be unable to blame the son.
In Buddhism, one of the five hindrances to waking up is worrying, a close stepsister to blame.
In his fourth chapter Sher, taking the surprising route that it can be reasonable to blame people for aspects of themselves that they cannot change, argues that it can be morally reasonable to blame people for their character traits.
We, the general public, are to blame for wanting round-the-clock opening
We look for someone, something, to blame, to take responsibility for the upset of our lives, our hopes, our dreams.
Each effort touches on who was to blame for the Japanese operation's military success.
Barber blames business for creating jihad sentiment, fueling arguments that trickle down to leftist professors, who inflame students and fan the rumors that inspire the masses to blame their poverty on business and the U.
They're going to blame this on the Jews," another friend shrieked.
By the time he changed his mind in 1996, the damage was largely done, leaving history to decide if the fault was his, for rejecting relief when it was offered, or if the United States was to blame, for leading the opposition in the UN to simply ending the sanctions.
Any honest reader can supply experiences that corroborate McWhorter's account, but if racism is receding, as he insists, then surely, too, there are countless little daily acts of courage by blacks who shake the perversely comforting impulse to blame racism so incessantly that their anti-racism itself becomes delusional.
I was recently asked why I seem to blame white people in my book, Forgiveness: Breaking the Chain of Hate.
Discussions of blaming biases, role development, personal choice, and situational versus character attribution styles are masterfully threaded throughout the chapters leading to an in-depth examination of why survivors tend to blame themselves and why perpetrators tend to blame others.
The one thing you can't do in 1995 is not find someone to blame for your problems.
This allows him to blame the victim while still admitting to the crime.