thug

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Synonyms for thug

Synonyms for thug

a person who treats others violently and roughly, especially for hire

Synonyms for thug

an aggressive and violent young criminal

References in periodicals archive ?
Though he may lack Oliver Reed's air of intelligent menace, Jamie successfully projects a mix of thuggishness, self pity and native cunning appropriate for a modestly successful villain, the perfect foil for Fagin's (Ben Kingsley) wiliness.
We also tend to overlook the fact that thuggishness is an integral, not an accidental, feature of Marxism.
During the miners' strike we saw TV pictures of unacceptable police behaviour bordering on outright thuggishness.
I will be as livid in Lisbon at their thuggishness as I was stunned in Stuttgart all those years ago.
Which takes the popular, as in rap, perverts the recurring themes of democracy, resistance, straggle, oppression and transforms them into a glorification of lumpen criminal Thuggishness.
In many ways a forlorn land, maltreated by czars, nearly a century of communist thuggishness and now beset by corruption and other hardships, it yet put that permanent space vehicle into orbit.
Much attention has been devoted to his thuggishness, relatively less to his artistry.
Saying that, when you see one father-of-three with Miley Cyrus and her lyrics plastered all over his body, thoughts of thuggishness are replaced by ones of "is this a spoof?
It was a tiny triumph of thoughtfulness over thuggishness.
The enormous progress the movement has made has never been without straggle or setbacks, and while our enemies' names might have changed, their duplicitous thuggishness hasn't.
SHAME on the loutish Celtic fans who brought their club into disrepute yesterday with a disgraceful display of bigotry and thuggishness.
Not that a captivating game ever threatened to cross the boundary into thuggishness.
David Blunkett linked swearing to thuggishness and brutality, though language is usually seen to reflect feelings, rather than create then.
Even more troubling than Kopkind's thuggishness was his embrace of revolutionary anarchy.