telegraphist

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Synonyms for telegraphist

someone who transmits messages by telegraph

References in periodicals archive ?
He completed his basic training in Saint-Hyacinthe, later training as a telegraphist and wireless operator.
If spirits could "potentially serve as a valuable source of inexpensive labour" so, too, would telegraphists and typists become labour-saving devices, providing "a virtually inexhaustible source of energy" (Enns 61).
(57) A live electric wire was stretched diagonally across the stage with two telegraphists at either end, sitting at their machines.
In the early days, telegraphists would type in Morse Code.
Dunkley, Louisa Margaret (1866-1927), advocated for equal pay for women telegraphists in 1890s.
He trained his own radio telegraphists and placed them on all ships he equipped with a wireless radio station.
On the same day that Captain Scott and his party reached the South Pole, a morse code message was sent by telegraphists on Mawson's expedition from a transmitter on Macquarie Island to a second receiver located on the island.
The couple met while working as telegraphists at a post office in Cardiff.
Telegraphists, telephonists, engineers and postal workers.
Crespo, et al., "Comments on: Verification of generalized telegraphists equations applied to dielectric waveguide problems," Applied Optics, Vol.
Made up of cooks, clerks, wireless telegraphists, electricians and air mechanics, the original Wrens membership accounted for 5,500 before it disbanded in 1919.
If the problem is seen as arising from a new technology, rather than as a phenomenon that may have arisen from different work in the past, the resemblance to telegraphists' cramp, which was investigated by Smith, Culpin, and Farmer (1927) for the IHRB, will not be noticed.
When radio telegraphy became widely used in ships, naval signals specialists made the important discovery that Morse sending was distinctly personal; and a telegraphists 'fist' was as identifiable as his fingerprint.