suspicion

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Synonyms for suspicion

Synonyms for suspicion

intuitive cognition

lack of trust

a subtle quality underlying or felt to underlie a situation, action, or person

Synonyms for suspicion

an impression that something might be the case

the state of being suspected

being of a suspicious nature

References in periodicals archive ?
149, 155 (2004) (concluding "the Government's authority to conduct suspicionless inspections at the border includes the authority to remove, disassemble, and reassemble a vehicle's fuel tank").
(50) Opponents argue that such tests--especially tests not based on a reasonable suspicion of drug use, i.e., suspicionless testing--violate the constitutional prohibition on unreasonable searches and seizures.
(51) The Court's skepticism of suspicionless searches and seizures seems rooted in the intuition that there is a personal right at stake.
(10) Part IV argues, alternatively, that a reading of the Fourth Amendment permitting hash searches would also permit suspicionless algorithmic searches for ordinary evidence of criminal wrongdoing--twenty-first century general warrants.
The ACLU is also suing Milwaukee for its high-volume stop-and-frisk program, which the civil rights group says subjects minority residents to suspicionless searches.
I mean, a lot of people, when you protest against, say, Obama's overuse of the Espionage Act, or the kind of mass suspicionless surveillance, or even the malware delivered to various journalists and stuff that happened during that time, a lot of people sort of just said, "Well, it'll be used judiciously." You know, "Obama's a good guy," basically.
(44) However, under very limited conditions, suspicionless stops are considered reasonable.
(29) Against this backdrop, he condemned the "suspicionless" DNA swabbing in Maryland v.
The kind of "suspicionless surveillance" carried out by intelligence agencies, such as the U.S.
King, the Court recently upheld suspicionless collection of DNA from arrestees.
This simple precept would have significant implications for regulation of police work, in particular the type of suspicionless, group searches and seizures that have been the subject of the Supreme Court's special needs jurisprudence (practices that this Article calls "panvasive").
I argue, in contrast, that suspicionless digital searches at customs are unreasonable under section 8 of the Charter.
Nance, Random, Suspicionless Searches of Students' Belongings: A Legal, Empirical, and Normative Analysis, 84 U.