suprematism


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Words related to suprematism

a geometric abstractionist movement originated by Kazimir Malevich in Russia that influenced constructivism

References in periodicals archive ?
Suprematism is a trend that's confident, optimistic and supremely chic.
The 13 papers in this collection are from a conference in New York City during December 2015 to mark the centenary of the emergence of Suprematism in May 1915 and its entrance into the Russian public arena in November and December that year.
As Suprematism took the world by storm, Malevitch's teaching style and charisma slowly saw him win the favor of students and staff at the institution.
Maritain makes it clear that he did not just have various forms of Expressionism in mind in describing this crisis, but Malevich and his stark Suprematism, Kandinsky with his theosophical ruminations on the spiritual in art, and Mondrian's geometric patterns which, in their abstraction, sought to leave the conditions of existence behind forever.
Zamyatin draws his inspiration from Paul Scheerbart's view of the relation between architecture and society, from Malevitch's suprematism, and from architectural constructivism (glass buildings, collective housing) to parody their utopian views and to draw attention to their totalitarian potential.
In 2014, the pair took their creative marriage to the next level with the Raf Simons Sterling Ruby collection, which consisted of pieces such as jackets inspired by Ruby's Mexican blanket meets Russian Suprematism collages; red, white, and blue knits of the exact hues used in the artist's "soft sculptures" of menacing snake fangs skinned with American flags and dripping cartoonish droplets of blood; and monochrome outfits splattered with bleach, reminiscent not only of works around the studio but of what Ruby wears while making them.
The collective NSK, building on retrogardist ideas, drew on the works of the utopian Russian avant-garde, primarily Malevich's suprematism. Seeking to expose contrasts in the society, it frequently used Malevich's cross and square, and it highlighted the role of the arts in promoting the ruling ideology.
Myroslava Mudrak knows that symbolisme cannot support his Suprematism, which is why Malevich placed so much stock in cubism; hence, 'Malevich's emulation of icon elements constitutes only a brief period in his artistic life' ends just where we hoped it would start.
By 'religious' I refer to the suspicion that it is a belief-based rather than an evidence-based ideology that supports market suprematism, or what McKenzie Wark and Jennifer Mills have named 'thanaticism', after the Greek daemon personifying death: 'Thanaticism: like a fanaticism, a gleeful, overly enthusiastic will to death.
The death of painting has been prematurely declared since the birth of photography in the 19th century and through Cubism and Suprematism before the First World War.
Artists already somewhat aware, before Gray's book, of the Russians (echoes of Malevich and Suprematism are present in prior work by Flavin, and of Rodchenko in that of Andre), who now begin to adapt Bolshevik-Constructivist principles to their work like there's no tomorrow.