Sue

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Synonyms for Sue

take (someone) to court

Synonyms

  • take (someone) to court
  • prosecute
  • bring an action against (someone)
  • charge
  • summon
  • indict
  • have the law on (someone)
  • prefer charges against (someone)
  • institute legal proceedings against (someone)

Synonyms for Sue

to institute or subject to legal proceedings

to make an earnest or urgent request

to make application to a higher authority, as to a court of law

to bring an appeal or request, for example, to the attention of

Synonyms for Sue

French writer whose novels described the sordid side of city life (1804-1857)

Synonyms

institute legal proceedings against

References in periodicals archive ?
In the case of the Central American governments suing the tobacco companies, the governments' health ministries wanted the cigarette makers to reimburse them for the cost of treating smokers who fell ill.
The second element requires that a reasonable connection exist between the contents of the accountant's misrepresentations and the action the suing party took by relying on them.
The people who were suing were sick, and the companies being sued were at fault because they knew about the hazards of asbestos, but failed to warn people.
If suing multiple defendants, the plaintiff could choose which defendant to use in support of venue in a particular county.
With his current legal battle, one of the obstacles faced by Kaufman's attorneys is that, surprisingly, New York State has not had a single case involving a property owner suing an association to enforce regulations.
Further, the appellants were not precluded from suing die firm because of their standing as third parties (as opposed to being actual clients).
Aided by the American Civil Liberties Union, the couple is suing the school system.
The Patient Protection Act allows individuals to sue their health plan while limiting damages and prohibiting the individual from suing the employer, unless the it was directly involved in making a medical decision.
It is ironic that these Fortune 500 high-tech companies are suing their property insurers for more than $1 billion to cover the cost of remediating Y2K problems in computer systems that they probably designed and programmed years ago.
A North Carolina jury recently mulcted the Meineke muffler chain for an estimated $400 million to $600 million, more than the annual profits of its large British parent company, after a lawyer invited jurors to "send a message to foreign companies." This September a New Jersey court ruled in favor of class-action lawyers suing Thorn PLC (formerly half of the Thorn EMI music group), the British parent of the Rent-a-Center chain, in a case that Thom says might cost it $120 million.