suburbanize

(redirected from suburbanizing)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • verb

Synonyms for suburbanize

take on suburban character

Synonyms

Related Words

make suburban in character

Synonyms

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
Sarna, American Judaism: A History (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2004), 282-93, for an overview of the religious background of newly suburbanizing Jews and the efforts of the Reform, Conservative, and Orthodox movements to satisfy their religious needs.
Jobs have been suburbanizing at a phenomenal pace in recent decades, so much so that the "reverse commute" from city to suburbs now rivals that of suburb to city.
Yet more recently it has experienced intensive industrialization, with a consequent suburbanizing of the countryside.
Then, worried that the neighborhood was deteriorating, his parents uprooted and bought a house in distant Selden, in the dead center of suburbanizing Long Island.
But we are interested in the suburbanizing trend, and the data do suggest a dramatic growth in suburban population.
Put crudely, his study is of the emergence in America of the white-collar suburbanizing middle class.
Meanwhile the opposite continues to happen - and today blacks are suburbanizing more rapidly than whites.
First, it is set amidst a suburbanizing landscape near a major urban area, Minneapolis-St.
Miller uses the story of the Baltimore Orioles, baseball's most successful post--Second World War franchise on the field, to illustrate a larger set of issues thrust on baseball by a suburbanizing, racially segregated nation with a seemingly unquenchable thirst for leisure-time activities.
Blumin gives credence to Whitman's belief that it was important to celebrate "the emergence in America of the whitecollar, suburbanizing middle class."
Post ('Urban railway redivivus ...', in Suburbanizing the Masses, ed.
At the same time, poverty is no longer concentrated in the central city, but is suburbanizing rapidly.
Never mind that most black Americans are solidly working class; never mind that white ethnics, insofar as they can even be counted, given the relatively optional nature of ethnic identity, have been suburbanizing en masse since the 1920s with the rest of white America.
However, even when the control set is broadened to include all suburbanizing and rural municipalities near Philadelphia, the average annual difference in price indexes between Preservation and Control from 1972 to 1981 approaches 50 percent, while that for 1982 to 1986 is over 40 percent.
Firm decentralization will reduce total commuting only if one of the following conditions holds: (a) the firm's employees are located in one portion of the city so that the firm can locate nearer to them by suburbanizing; (b) the employees are willing to move in order to be near the new suburban location; (c) the firm can change employees and thereby employ people who live near the new location.