subjection


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Related to subjection: abiding, ailing, ascertain, seize
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Synonyms for subjection

Synonyms for subjection

References in classic literature ?
One example of the shameless subterfuges under which the French stand prepared to defend whatever cruelties they may hereafter think fit to commit in bringing the Marquesan natives into subjection is well worthy of being recorded.
They claimed exemption from the mandates of human authority, as militating with their subjection to a superior power.
After twelve years of banishment from the land of their first allegiance, during which they had been under an adoptive and temporary subjection to another sovereign, they must naturally have been led to reflect upon the relative rights and duties of allegiance and subjection.
When that portentous system of abuses, the Papal dominion, was overturned, a great variety of religious sects arose in its stead in the several countries, which for many centuries before had been screwed beneath its subjection. The fabric of the Reformation, first undertaken in England upon a contracted basis, by a capricious and sanguinary tyrant, had been successively overthrown and restored, renewed and altered, according to the varying humors and principles of four successive monarchs.
She inherits her mother's talents, and must have been under subjection to her."
Subjection of Nature's forces to man, machinery, application of chemistry to industry and agriculture, steam-navigation, railways, electric telegraphs, clearing of whole continents for cultivation, canalisation of rivers, whole populations conjured out of the ground -- what earlier century had even a presentiment that such productive forces slumbered in the lap of social labour?
The proletarian is without property; his relation to his wife and children has no longer anything in common with the bourgeois family-relations; modern industrial labour, modern subjection to capital, the same in England as in France, in America as in Germany, has stripped him of every trace of national character.
Hartman, Scenes of Subjection: Terror, Slavery, and Self-Making in Nineteenth-Century America (New York: Oxford University Press 1997).
Hartman's Scenes of Subjection: Terror, Slavery, and Self-Making in Nineteenth-Century America is about a profoundly important subject.
Specifically, in his 1988 apostolic letter "Mulieris dignitatem" ("On the Dignity and Vocation of Women"), he definitively abandoned the long-standing teaching on the headship of men in marriage: "All the reasons in favor of the `subjection' of woman to man in marriage must be understood in the sense of a `mutual subjection' of both `out of reverence for Christ.'" For the pope, this rejection of relations of domination is the innovation that is at the heart of the gospel.
Although it does not mention him by name, Scenes of Subjection offers an illuminating cultural history of the forms of perception that convinced a jury in Simi Valley, California, that the prostrate body of Rodney King invited a heating from officers of the L.A.P.D.
In political action, by contrast, increasing dependence necessarily becomes increasing subjection to the authority of others.
Here, woman is punished with subjection to man for breaking a prohibitory law....
His only book, Tropic Death (1926), a collection of short stories set against a lush Caribbean backdrop, juxtaposed impressionistic images of natural beauty with terse descriptions of misery and death in such stories as "The Yellow One," "The Palm Porch," and "Subjection." Walrond left the United States in 1927 and traveled throughout Europe before his death.
The subjection on Prussia left its ally, Russia, still in the field.