subject


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Related to subject: Subject and object
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Synonyms for subject

branch of study

Synonyms

put through

subject to: liable to

Synonyms

  • liable to
  • open to
  • exposed to
  • vulnerable to
  • prone to
  • susceptible to
  • disposed to

subject to: bound by

Synonyms

  • bound by
  • under the control of
  • accountable to
  • constrained by

subject to: dependent on

Synonyms

Synonyms for subject

in a position of subordination

determined or to be determined by someone or something else

a person owing loyalty to and entitled to the protection of a given state

what a speech, piece of writing, or artistic work is about

to lay open, as to something undesirable or injurious

Synonyms

to make subservient or subordinate

Synonyms for subject

the subject matter of a conversation or discussion

something (a person or object or scene) selected by an artist or photographer for graphic representation

some situation or event that is thought about

(grammar) one of the two main constituents of a sentence

a person who is subjected to experimental or other observational procedures

(logic) the first term of a proposition

Related Words

cause to experience or suffer or make liable or vulnerable to

make accountable for

Related Words

make subservient

refer for judgment or consideration

possibly accepting or permitting

Synonyms

Related Words

being under the power or sovereignty of another or others

Synonyms

Related Words

likely to be affected by something

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
Other things, again, are both predicable of a subject and present in a subject.
There is, lastly, a class of things which are neither present in a subject nor predicable of a subject, such as the individual man or the individual horse.
As he is presented as sensitive enough to be affected permanently by a certain unusual experience, that experience had to be set by me before the reader vividly; but it is not the subject of the tale.
It is so intensely and deliberately didactic, and its subject is esteemed so dry, that I delight in throwing it at the heads of the wiseacres who repeat the parrot cry that art should never be didactic.
Fortunately for him, at this period so difficult for him from the failure of his book, the various public questions of the dissenting sects, of the American alliance, of the Samara famine, of exhibitions, and of spiritualism, were definitely replaced in public interest by the Slavonic question, which had hitherto rather languidly interested society, and Sergey Ivanovitch, who had been one of the first to raise this subject, threw himself into it heart and soul.
He saw, too, that a great many people were taking up the subject from motives of self-interest and self-advertisement.
Some portion of this knowledge may, no doubt, be acquired in a man's closet; but some of it also can only be derived from the public sources of information; and all of it will be acquired to best effect by a practical attention to the subject during the period of actual service in the legislature.
No argument can be drawn on this subject, from the case of the delegates to the existing Congress.
And the laws which they make must be obeyed by their subjects,-- and that is what you call justice?
To such an extent had Natasha let herself go that the way she dressed and did her hair, her ill-chosen words, and her jealousy- she was jealous of Sonya, of the governess, and of every woman, pretty or plain- were habitual subjects of jest to those about her.
The Scottish magician, you said, was, like Lucan's witch, at liberty to walk over the recent field of battle, and to select for the subject of resuscitation by his sorceries, a body whose limbs had recently quivered with existence, and whose throat had but just uttered the last note of agony.
The English author, on the other hand, without supposing him less of a conjuror than the Northern Warlock, can, you observed, only have the liberty of selecting his subject amidst the dust of antiquity, where nothing was to be found but dry, sapless, mouldering, and disjointed bones, such as those which filled the valley of Jehoshaphat.
Pope Julius the Second was assisted in reaching the papacy by a reputation for liberality, yet he did not strive afterwards to keep it up, when he made war on the King of France; and he made many wars without imposing any extraordinary tax on his subjects, for he supplied his additional expenses out of his long thriftiness.
Freedom from the domination of the great tradition could only be found by seeking new subjects, and such freedom was really only illusionary, since romantic subjects alone are suitable for epic treatment.
In Ionia and the islands the epic poets followed the Homeric tradition, singing of romantic subjects in the now stereotyped heroic style, and showing originality only in their choice of legends hitherto neglected or summarily and imperfectly treated.