straining


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Synonyms for straining

an intense or violent exertion

the act of distorting something so it seems to mean something it was not intended to mean

taxing to the utmost

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References in classic literature ?
he slumped to the floor, twisted his silken limbs in one great straining contortion of pain, and was dead.
Of course we think a good deal of Jupiter, because our world is only a potato to it, for size; but then there are worlds in other systems that Jupiter isn't even a mustard-seed to - like the planet Goobra, for instance, which you couldn't squeeze inside the orbit of Halley's comet without straining the rivets.
People rose up wild all over the house, straining and staring for a better look at him, and the judge was hammering with his mallet and the sheriff yelling "Order--order in the court--order
She had always been straining to make the outward world conform to her inward dreams, and now life had grown all at once rich and sweet, wide and full.
I was now too fond of you often to simulate the first whim; and, when I stretched my hand out cordially, such bloom and light and bliss rose to your young, wistful features, I had much ado often to avoid straining you then and there to my heart.
I think he swore: but I didn't mind him, I was straining to see the bairn,' and she began again to describe it rapturously.
She would fain have persuaded herself that she had reached these results with no undue straining of the truth as she really knew it, but the effort was in vain.
From the dimly-lighted passages of the court, the last sediment of the human stew that had been boiling there all day, was straining off, when Doctor Manette, Lucie Manette, his daughter, Mr.
By dint of straining that term out of myself several times and tapping the old gentleman on the chest to associate it with him, I at last succeeded in making my meaning understood.
Any one who had looked at him as the red light shone upon his pale face, strange straining eyes, and meagre form, would perhaps have understood the mixture of contemptuous pity, dread, and suspicion with which he was regarded by his neighbours in Raveloe.