stimulant


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • noun
  • adj

Synonyms for stimulant

Synonyms for stimulant

Synonyms for stimulant

References in classic literature ?
At the same moment the door of the room below opened, and the captain's mellifluous bass notes floated upstairs, charged with the customary stimulant to his wife's faculties.
Before her husband's corrective voice could apply a fresh stimulant, Magdalen took her compassionately by the arm and led her out of the room.
When the other stimulants lost their influence, I doubled the dose.
Muguka farmers and dealers have dismissed claims that the mild stimulant causes cancer.
Rawson was executive director of the nonprofit Matrix Institute on Addictions from 1984-88, and contributed to the development of the Matrix Model for outpatient stimulant addiction treatment.
HIBS manager Neil Lennon and a host of other football stars are allegedly using a banned stimulant with links to cancer.
Because of this, I will need your help in prescribing a very strong s3x stimulant so I can cope with the demands of my new position.
Several laboratory studies have confirmed the beneficial effects of the application of colonization stimulant (NOVAIS & SIQUEIRA, 2009).
The Swiss biotech's drug is a non-stimulant, however trial data revealed it could be as effective as a stimulant. These are generally more effective but have a risk to be abused and can be poorly tolerated by patients and, in rare cases, can even be fatal.
If the immediate-release component of a given long-acting stimulant formation is relatively high, "that is a particularly good medication for early-morning problems, such as a math class in the first period," said Dr.
Stimulant drugs are generally prescribed for the treatment of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), narcolepsy and some cases of depression.
Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder take longer to fall asleep and sleep less efficiently when they are taking stimulant medications, according to a meta-analysis.
For children of a parent with a severe mental illness, taking a stimulant for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder might be associated with an increased risk of psychotic symptoms, such as delusions and hallucinations.
While some students compare stimulant medications to caffeine in order to illustrate the relative similarity of both licit and illicit stimulants as tools to enhance studying in the university context, other students suggest that those comparisons are untenable due to the heightened health risks associated with NM-stimulant use.
While stimulant use is most common, students also are misusing a variety of other prescription medications, the survey maintains.