stairhead


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Words related to stairhead

platform at the top of a staircase

References in periodicals archive ?
In The Things We Mean, Schiffer tells us that in Joyce's Ulysses, in a statement like "Stately, plum Buck Mulligan came from the stairhead, bearing a bowl of lather on which a mirror and a razor lay crossed," "Buck Mulligan" occurs as a genuinely referential singular term, whose referent is a fictional character (Schiffer, 51).
"When me and my old man first got th'gither, he thought fit to serenade me outside the stairhead lavvy with a sheet of Izal toilet paper, folded and blown through his oily old comb!
As Buck attempts to "rid" Stephen of his creative thought-vermin -- to consume them, as it were -- they and Stephen are transubstantiated by the mirror to become an immortal "God's body," a consecrated "host" for the mock-Mass that Buck has been conducting from the first sentence of the novel a sentence in which the same mirror appears: "Stately, plump Buck Mulligan came on the stairhead, bearing a bowl of lather on which a mirror and a razor lay crossed" (Joyce 1961, 1).
Text: "Stately, plump Buck Mulligan came from the stairhead, bearing a bowl of lather on which a mirror and a razor lay crossed." He Writes Like: James Joyce.
In contrast to Stephen's silence, Mulligan's invocation of Yeats's "Who Goes with Fergus?" resounds with confident authority as "the drone of his descending voice boom[s] out of the stairhead":
One contemporary, John Macky, who claimed to have been a spy for William III, Anne, and George I, summed up the conventional image of George of Denmark: "he is very fat, loves news, the bottle, and the Queen." (51) Another contemporary, Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, who knew him well, commented that "The Prince used to employ himself agreeably all day either in standing upon a stairhead or looking out a window, making malicious remarks upon the passerby," concluding that "Anne grew uneasy at the figure his highness cut in that princely amusement." (52)
("The first sentence of Ulysses is one: `Stately, plump Buck Mulligan came from the stairhead, bearing a bowl of lather on which a mirror and a razor lay crossed.'")This motif preoccupied Pouissin, Monet, and van Gogh.