spoonerism


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Related to spoonerism: malapropism
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Words related to spoonerism

transposition of initial consonants in a pair of words

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The most recent compilation of my own "story spoonerisms" appeared in the February 2009 issue of Word Ways.
(Samples: "I'm So Indicted." "Help Me Fake It to the Right.") But every show also includes a spoken-word spoonerism routine.
The second half of the book is a compendium of language games--acronyms, euphemisms, spoonerisms, malapropisms, oxymorons, tautologies--I won't name them all but you get the idea!
The transposition of letters in Marcus's name could be interpreted as a revealing slip of the tongue, a spoonerism, but one performed consciously, to both acknowledge the morbid specters that haunt all talk of painting and to get them out of the way.
A spoonerism is a transposition--typically of the initial sounds of two or more words--and it is named after a man who became well known for making such verbal slips.
I lovE | abitof spoonerism me - which, if you didn't know, is when people "p**spronounce their worms".
I LOVE | a bit of spoonerism me - which, if you didn't know, is when people 'p**spronounce their worms'.
Sometimes known as a spoonerism, The Brain Store has renamed this clever wordplay exercise.
The "scandalous" brand name - a spoonerism of "f...in nuts" - attracted widespread publicity earlier this year after news.com.au revealed the trademark examiner had accepted it for the register pending a three-month "opposition period," News.com.au reported.
Linguistically speaking, slips of the tongue are considered linguistic errors, also known as spoonerisms. What is a spoonerism?
The presenter proceeded to interview Mr Hunt without incident, but later issued several apologies for his "Spoonerism" - a reference to Dr William Spooner who was notorious for inappropriately switching letters between words.
Like this one: " 'Riddle of the Mode' is a spoonerism of what political position?"
Yet it seems Betfair's feather pluckers - yes, it's quite a neat Spoonerism - haven't mastered their craft, based on the relentless hissing from geese who have been told that the golden eggs they hatched have suddenly shot up in price.
In addition to the spoonerism and reversed words, (Plato doesn't care for words like Bob, noon, etc.) enough puns were peppered throughout the book to keep this reader entertained enough that a plot wasn't necessary.