space

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Synonyms for space

Synonyms for space

an extent, measured or unmeasured, of linear space

a wide and open area, as of land, sky, or water

a rather short period

Synonyms for space

a blank character used to separate successive words in writing or printing

the interval between two times

Synonyms

one of the areas between or below or above the lines of a musical staff

(printing) a block of type without a raised letter

place at intervals

References in classic literature ?
SOCRATES: Therefore the double line, boy, has given a space, not twice, but four times as much.
SOCRATES: What line would give you a space of eight feet, as this gives one of sixteen feet;--do you see?
SOCRATES: And the space of four feet is made from this half line?
Chief: Diadem with ten jewels; 3 spaces in any direction; straight or diagonal or combination.
Thoat: Mounted warrior 2 feathers; 2 spaces, one straight and one diagonal in any direction.
A Dwar might move straight north three spaces, or north one space and east two spaces, or any similar combination of straight moves, so long as he did not cross the same square twice in a single move.
To imagine a man perfectly free and not subject to the law of inevitability, we must imagine him all alone, beyond space, beyond time, and free from dependence on cause.
In the second case, if freedom were possible without inevitability we should have arrived at unconditioned freedom beyond space, time, and cause, which by the fact of its being unconditioned and unlimited would be nothing, or mere content without form.
Reason says: (1) space with all the forms of matter that give it visibility is infinite, and cannot be imagined otherwise.
Surely the mercury did not trace this line in any of the dimensions of Space generally recognized?
But,' said the Medical Man, staring hard at a coal in the fire, `if Time is really only a fourth dimension of Space, why is it, and why has it always been, regarded as something different?
This body revolved upon its axis, and exhibited the phenomena of all celestial bodies abandoned in space.
The asteroid passed several hundred yards from the projectile and disappeared, not so much from the rapidity of its course, as that its face being opposite the moon, it was suddenly merged into the perfect darkness of space.
Near it in the field, I remember, were three faint points of light, three telescopic stars infinitely remote, and all around it was the unfathomable darkness of empty space.
And, all unsuspected, those missiles the Martians had fired at us drew earthward, rushing now at a pace of many miles a second through the empty gulf of space, hour by hour and day by day, nearer and nearer.