soil

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Related to soil fumigants: chloropicrin
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Synonyms for soil

Synonyms for soil

Synonyms for soil

References in periodicals archive ?
While the berry industry has been very successful in recent decades, it now faces new challenges, such as invasive pests and the phaseout of the soil fumigant methyl bromide.
In an effort to avoid jumping from the frying pan into the fire, the EPA is conducting a soil fumigant cluster risk assessment for methyl bromide, chloropicrin, 1,3-D, metam sodium, dazomet, and iodomethane.
In March 2012, after a decade seeking regulatory approval for the soil fumigant methyl iodide, Arysta LifeScience withdrew it from the United States and other markets.
One approach to coping with loss of methyl bromide as a soil fumigant in commercial strawberry and vegetable fields is to use a special plastic covering called a "virtually impermeable film," or VIF.
Currently, soil fumigants are usually applied under standard polyethylene tarp, which is highly permeable and allows large amounts of fumigants to escape into the atmosphere (Gao et al.
And it could serve as an alternative to methyl bromide and other soil fumigants typically used to sterilize old orchards before planting new trees.
While these were helpful in preventing pest outbreaks, and are still widely used today, increased use of soil fumigants since the 1950s has provided additional rapid, effective and inexpensive pest management.
There will be fewer and fewer chemicals in the future," says Sjulin, noting the impending loss of methyl bromide and possibly other important soil fumigants.
6: Residual soil fumigants (1,3-D and chloropicrin) 14 days after fumigant application in the fall 2009 trial.
With the help of Fravel, Wilson built an apparatus to quickly and easily test soil fumigants against soil pathogens.
Clean Air Act, the DPR must reduce agricultural emissions of smog-forming VOCs from soil fumigants and other pesticides.
And the State of New York was spending more than $250,000 a year for the soil fumigants to treat infested fields.