sociolinguistics

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Words related to sociolinguistics

the study of language in relation to its sociocultural context

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Sociolinguists argue that one should investigate bilinguals' language use and code switching not only in terms of linguistic rules, but more importantly, the rules of language use that are shared by the members of the community to accomplish communicative functions (Romaine, 1989).
Clair 1979) and sociolinguists, like William Labov (1972, 2001), to elicit listeners' reactions to accents.
It is a must not only for every linguist interested in pidgins and creoles and their history, but also for sociolinguists interested in language change and development, as well as for all linguists working in the area
Having said this, I believe that this book will be of considerable interest to sociolinguists from a variety of backgrounds, students of Scottish language and, it is to be hoped, Scottish language policy-makers.
The author does well to quote the doyen of American sociolinguists, Joshua A.
According to sociolinguists Erlinda Gonzalez-Berry and Shaw Gynan, many
The Welsh Policy Forum report - basis for next year's election manifesto - adopts the Fro Gymraeg arguments about the crucial importance of the linguistic heartland which have been pressed for decades by sociolinguists, have recently been massively articulated by the pressure group Cymuned and are now quietly accepted by politicians as significant as deputy language Minister Delyth Evans and former Attorney-General Sir John Morris.
The demise of variable rules, whereby probabilities associated with social and linguistic constraints were incorporated into generative rules, was due in part at least to the realization among sociolinguists in the 1980s that it was simply unnecessary to adopt the formalization of Chomskyan linguistics to display patterns of variation.
It has been demonstrated by sociolinguists that women and men do not speak alike.
This is not to say that sociolinguists have ignored language teaching and learning.
The author presents the poststructuralist view of identity popular among social theorists, sociologists, anthropologists, and sociolinguists and their perspectives on identity in terms of race, ethnicity, nationality, migration, gender, social class, and language; identity as an issue in past second language learning research from the 1960s, 70s, and 80s; and how research in the 1990s and 2000s has examined identity in the three learning contexts.
Linguists, sociolinguists, and scholars of particular languages compare and contrast language policies and their practical outcomes in Australia, Europe, and North America.
This research invites the sociolinguists and language planners to conduct further research in the area of SMS vernacular varieties and its influence on Standard English.
Since much of what we know about accentual variability and the sound changes that result from it is based only on the study of production, rather than production and perception, it could be argued that in their accounts of phonological variation and change sociolinguists have until very recently only been telling half of the only on the study of production, rather than production and perception, it could be argued that in their accounts of phonological variation and change sociolinguists have until very recently only been telling half of the story.
Nor can it be said that Croft presents a complete, sociohistorically well-rooted account of what social motivations boil down to: the model presented in Chapter 7 looks more like a synthesis of proposals advanced by sociolinguists than an original, overarching framework able to account for the propagation of linguistic changes.