snow-blind

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Synonyms for snow-blind

affect with snow blindness

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temporarily blinded by exposure to light reflected from snow or ice

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References in periodicals archive ?
Suffering from increasing snow blindness and frostbite, he amputated nine of his toes with a pocket knife, fearing that gangrene was spreading through his body.
Bonita, from Wokingham in Berkshire, risked frostbite, hypothermia and snow blindness when she became the youngest British woman to reach the summit of Mount Everest.
Peter was perfectly coherent at this time and calmly explained that the condition was not snow blindness as he had no pain and he recognised the blindness from a previous episode.
Met Office spokesman John Hammond said accidents early in the day in adverse weather conditions are common, adding: "This snow blindness can be a problem at this time of year when people are driving to work and the sun is bright but low in the sky.
The cornea of the eye is more vulnerable to UV light than skin and tends to suffer such acute disorders as snow blindness, in which the cornea or the conjunctiva is inflamed, and even cataracts, or clouded lenses, if such blindness is repeated, Sasaki warns, calling for the use of goggles rather than sunglasses to protect the eyes.
The native Inuit taught him how to combat snow blindness and build a shelter.
But he pushed on as he was starting to suffer snow blindness.
UV RAYS REFLECTING OFF THE SNOW CAN BURN YOUR CORNEAS AND CAUSE SNOW BLINDNESS.
There's a high risk of injury, low body temperatures, frostbite, sunburn and snow blindness.
The survey concluded that it is essential to take preventive measures against the reflection of sunlight off of snow because the UV exposure induces various eye diseases and risks including snow blindness and pterygium as well as cataracts.
After spending many hours in the snow for rescue training, UV radiation (form of invisible light) can damage the unprotected eyes and cause snow blindness.
Symptoms of snow blindness include painful, gritty eyes with profuse tearing, blurred vision, and possibly, a headache.
snow blindness, getting lost, falling into a crevasse, frostbite, and exhaustion) that lurk nearby.