slave traffic


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Related to slave traffic: White Slave Traffic Act
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Synonyms for slave traffic

traffic in slaves

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(1) Four international conventions were passed between 1904 and 1933 that specifically addressed human trafficking; the Suppression of White Slave Traffic 1904, the Suppression of White Slave Traffic 1910, the Suppression of Traffic in Women and Children 1921 and the Suppression of Traffic of Women of Full Age 1933.
The international trend to address the crime of trafficking in persons goes back to 18 May 1904 when the governments of a handful of states came together to conclude the International Agreement for the Suppression of the White Slave Traffic. (72) The agreement was followed by the 4 May 1910 International Convention for the Suppression of the White Slave Traffic, (73) the 30 September 1921 International Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Women and Children (74) (amended by the Protocol approved by the General Assembly of the United Nations on 20 October 1947), and the International Convention of 11 October 1933 for the Suppression of the Traffic in Women of Full Age.
Most of these left from Brazil, given the low volume of the Cuban slave traffic in the 1840s, and only four from the United States.
Frances' examines the 'white slave traffic' links between Australia, Europe, Asia, the Middle-East, South Africa and North and South America.
the 1910 Mann Act, also know as White Slave Traffic Act) and recent trafficking policy, both of which provide a context for current trafficking discourse.
But why have they nothing to say on raiders from further East than West Africa who carried slave traffic well into the 20th Century, or foreigners currently operating openly at our air and sea ports, immune from interference that might offend their human rights?
28, 2004); International Agreement for the Suppression of the "White Slave Traffic," May 18, 1904, 35 Stat.
Mann of Chicago, Chairman of the House Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, introduced a bill to combat "white slave traffic." (121) Passed the next year, the Mann Act (as it would become known) neatly bridged concerns about the movement of women across both international and interstate borders.
Global Convention for the Suppression of Trafficking against Women and Children (ratified by Chile in 1930); International Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Women of Full Age (ratified by Chile in 1935); International Convention for the Suppression of the White Slave Traffic (ratified by Chile in 1935).
(73) Second, it eschews the terms "white slave traffic" and "women," using for the first time race- and gender-neutral language.
They wanted to smash the White Slave Traffic; or, in its less melodramatic formulation, they wanted to de-commercialize vice by closing tolerated red-light districts.
The most tragic was the black slave traffic for the Muslim and Christian lords in the north.
Instead he joined the Quakers in attempting to influence public opinion against the "nefarious slave traffic."