skull


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Words related to skull

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The ears were small and rested flat against the skull, which was noticeably round, though the face was quite flat.
Upon each house was a slender column supporting a human skull.
Why taint noffin but a skull - somebody bin lef him head up de tree, and de crows done gobble ebery bit ob de meat off.
Why dis berry curous sarcumstance, pon my word - dare's a great big nail in de skull, what fastens ob it on to de tree.
She sought every where for him whose eyes had used to look tenderly into hers out of this poor skull, but she could not find him.
I thought he even looked as if he were thinking, with complacent vanity, that his own skull would look well on top of the heap and his own ribs add a charm to the frescoes which possibly they lacked at present.
Like the jed who had brought me, he was frightfully scarred, and also decorated with the breastplate of human skulls and dried dead hands which seemed to mark all the greater warriors among the Warhoons, as well as to indicate their awful ferocity, which greatly transcends even that of the Tharks.
Better not ask," said Peg again, with another glance at the skull.
In the first place Peg snored loudly; in the second place the fitful gleams of firelight kept flickering over the skull for half the night and making gruesome effects on it; in the third place Peg's pillows and bedclothes smelled rankly of tobacco smoke; and in the fourth place they were afraid the rat Peg had spoken of might come out to make their acquaintance.
When the long comrade had made these preparations, he looked towards Mr Tappertit; and Mr Tappertit, flourishing the bone, knocked nine times therewith upon one of the skulls.
At one place, they observed a field decorated with buffalo skulls, arranged in circles, curves, and other mathematical figures, as if for some mystic rite or ceremony.
Some day I will let you try to crush in my skull, and afterward you will know more about tigers than you do now.
Naturalists frequently speak of the skull as formed of metamorphosed vertebrae: the jaws of crabs as metamorphosed legs; the stamens and pistils of flowers as metamorphosed leaves; but it would in these cases probably be more correct, as Professor Huxley has remarked, to speak of both skull and vertebrae, both jaws and legs, &c.
I twigged it, knew it; had had the gift, might readily have prophesied it --for when I clapped my eye upon his skull I saw it.
THE MAN WHO LOVES NOT GRAVES AND COFFINS AND SKULLS.