synagogue

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  • noun

Synonyms for synagogue

(Judaism) the place of worship for a Jewish congregation

References in periodicals archive ?
That entails recording the conflicting claims on the American shul, examining the struggles over how Jewish identity is linked in complicated ways to politics.
My gloomy Year in shul is turning into an occasion for self congratulation.
20, 2013, Tues, Weds, Thurs & Sat at 8pm, and Sundays at 7PM at the Stanton Street Shul.
Kaufman cites five institutions to make his point: the Reform Temple, the YMHA, the settlement house, the Jewish school, and the immigrant shul.
WORCESTER -- Congregation Beth Israel, 15 Jamesbury Drive, invites you to enjoy the warmth of the sabbath in the middle of winter during its annual Shabbat in Shul on Feb.
Brooklyn, NY, October 14, 2011 --(PR.com)-- The Boro Park Center for Rehabilitation and Healthcare invites members of the community to join them at the opening of the all-new Boro Park Shul. Attendees of the free event will enjoy an uplifting Simchas Beis Hashoeva celebration lead by the world-renowned Yeshiva Boys Choir, as well as appearances by other surprise guests, free gifts for all and many other surprises.
I do not belong to a shul, I do not go to services.
We look forward to seeing you at the Eighth Miami International Torah and Science Conference at The Shul of Bal Harbour, 17-20 December 2009.
The exhibition was arranged on the second floor of the Stanton Street Shul, one of the last functioning Orthodox synagogues in the neighborhood.
Adath Israel, Cubaas only Orthodox shul, sees to its upkeep.
They think that just because they are fans of Judaism on Facebook, they don't have to come to shul. So we have come up with a set of handy recruiting tips.
In 1930 in Linas Hatzedek shul in Philadelphia the president was a man named Mr.
As a girl, Tova Hartman loved being the rabbi's daughter and adored her family's shul. Her father, David Hartman, led a modern Orthodox synagogue in Montreal that she remembers as being very "homey and warm." The holy space, she says, felt like a "second home."
The entrance to the shul is reportedly closed and welded shut, and still contains the Torah ark, though there is no Torah inside.
How do we discuss this past weekend's terrorist attack on Pittsburgh's Tree of Life shul with them?