semblance

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Synonyms for semblance

Synonyms for semblance

Synonyms for semblance

picture consisting of a graphic image of a person or thing

References in classic literature ?
The effect of this was magical: the words, intended as a mark of civility, were received as a flattering compliment; her countenance brightened up, and from that moment she became as gracious and benign as heart could wish--in outward semblance at least.
Finally the captains came, armored cap-a-pie, and with them some semblance of order and quiet out of chaos and bedlam.
It is wonderful how soon he transformed this rough mob of country people into the semblance of a regular army.
There was such fascination in her pluck, nimbleness, the continual exhibition of unfailing seaworthiness, in the semblance of courage and endurance, that I could not give up the delight of watching her run through the three unforgettable days of that gale which my mate also delighted to extol as "a famous shove.
The countless dismal windows, vacant and forlorn, stared, sightless, from their marble walls; the whole sad city taking on the semblance of scattered mounds of dead men's sun-bleached skulls--the casements having the appearance of eyeless sockets, the portals, grinning jaws.
It was a woman's love which kept Tarzan even to the semblance of civilization--a condition for which familiarity had bred contempt.
draws on her experiences teaching multicultural education to teacher-education students and learning to zydeco dance as she explores semblances of intimacy across self and other.
Now, even the LA Times and the mayor of SM have been audibly recorded professing semblances of Wilson's imminent quotable philosophy.
Sietsema's constructed plants, crafted of foam, paper, and paint, recapture and negate their real semblances - some were made after studying actual plants, but others only from small photos in seed catalogues or gardening magazines.
The other's vulnerable flesh breaks into semblances not to attest cognitive certainty, but to make an ethical claim that transcends the presentation of face and body as phenomena.