seafaring


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Synonyms for seafaring

Synonyms for seafaring

References in periodicals archive ?
The post Transport minister urges the young to pursue seafaring careers appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
This book is concerned not just with naval history or with seafaring activity but with 'the history of human activities relating to the sea and seafaring'.
Once a seafaring capital that prospered by strip-mining the global whale community, the island today is an ultra-chic summer destination for the affluent, with private jets lining the airport tarmac and one-bedroom shacks selling for half a million dollars.
Brundtland's personal life is depicted as an idyll in the beginning, with idealistic and politically active parents, and continuing with supportive husband and family, who share a spacious old house and two modest vacation homes, one for winter amidst snowy cross-country ski trails, and another summer cottage on a lake (not to mention a seafaring sailboat).
The Children of Noah: Jewish Seafaring in Ancient Times.
The convincing message of this beautifully produced book is that "Venetian colour" grows from the physical environment and cultural context, including the rich variety of materials available in seafaring Venice and the techniques developed in their use.
During his life Morgan Robertson wrote some 200 adventurous seafaring tales, but he would otherwise be forgotten without the Titanic disaster of 1912.
A vibrant and engaging work of rediscovery, Black Jacks restores to the historical record African American seamen's contribution to the Atlantic economy and the contribution of seafaring to the construction of African American identity.
Seafaring Phoenicians wired Mediterranean trade routes.
The Phoenicians were probably direct descendants of the Canaanites, the original inhabitants of Palestine, who developed a thriving seafaring empire founding colonies throughout the Mediterranean.
And at Brixham, there's all the traditions of seafaring Devon...plus superb food and lively night life.
French poet remarkable for his realistic pictures of seafaring life and for his innovative use of irony and slang and the rhythms of common speech, which contrasted sharply with the elevated lyricism of the French Romantics, whom he frequently parodied.
To satisfy all those finicky appetites, Dierenfeld spends about $1 million a year on mammoth-size meals: * 900 tons of hay for the elephants, giraffes, and other herbivores * 187 tons of fish to feed penguins, seals, and their seafaring friends * 36 tons of meat to toss to the lions and other carnivores * 4 tons of fruits and veggies for the birds, apes, and monkey gang * plus all the insects, worms, mice, and rats that reptiles and other critters can devour.
Hewes' Glory of the Seas (1933), Isabel Hopestill Carter's Shipmates: A Tale of the Seafaring Women of New England (1934), and Mary Ellen Chase's Silas Crockett (1935).
YOU VISIT ME BY THE SEA You loved the Atlantic anywhere you found it, said it was your Dutch blood, seafaring. If you arrived tomorrow, your yellow suitcase packed the other side of time, you would love this water: level with the sashline of my second-story window, rocky islands sprawled like sleeping dogs on the horizon.