scrooge


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  • noun

Synonyms for scrooge

miser

Synonyms for scrooge

Synonyms for scrooge

a selfish person who is unwilling to give or spend

References in classic literature ?
You were always a good friend to me,' said Scrooge.
Scrooge knew this, by the smart sound its teeth made, when the jaws were brought together by the bandage.
Many had been personally known to Scrooge in their lives.
We urge SSE not to play Scrooge and to spread some festive cheer.
Synopsis: A delightful homage to British mysteries, Victorian London, and Charles Dickens, "The Humbug Murders: An Ebenezer Scrooge Mystery" is a simply wonderful treat for all mystery buffs.
Contrast that scene with one of the show's closing moments, when Bob enters the Marley and Scrooge office 18 minutes late the day after Christmas, expecting a verbal lashing from his employer.
Scrooge - presumably running some sort of hedge fund - uses a laptop computer (although Bob Cratchit still seems to be inscribing a ledger).
The beloved tale adapted by Neil Bartlett and directed by Dominic Hill stars Cliff Burnett as Scrooge and features Christmas carols performed live on stage.
The story closely follows Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol, in which the miserly Ebenezer Scrooge is visited by the ghost of his former business partner, Jacob Marley, and the ghosts of Christmas Present, Past and Future.
Had Scrooge's office said Department for Work and Pensions on the door, instead of Scrooge and Marley, then it would have seemed all the more real.
8220;The beloved tale of Ebenezer Scrooge has resonated with generations for more than a century and embodies the hope and spirit of Christmas.
Scrooge thwacks his way through the side-scrolling levels with an unforgiving grace that will grate with modern audiences.
I was afraid, from what you said at first, that something had occurred to stop them in their useful course,' said Scrooge.
The first unforgettable lines of A Christmas Carol, the book that gave our language a new and enduring word for all that is mean-spirited and miserly: Scrooge.