scotch


Also found in: Dictionary, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to scotch: bourbon, Scotch and soda, Scotch Tape
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • verb
  • noun
  • adj

Synonyms for scotch

Synonyms for scotch

an incision, a notch, or a slight cut made with or as if with a knife

careful in the use of material resources

Synonyms for scotch

a slight surface cut (especially a notch that is made to keep a tally)

make a small cut or score into

Related Words

of or relating to or characteristic of Scotland or its people or culture or its English dialect or Gaelic language

avoiding waste

References in classic literature ?
Snuff is the one great luxury of such Scotch shepherds; it's the one thing with which you can bribe them.
"You see," said Father Brown in low but easy tone, "Scotch people before Scotland existed were a curious lot.
"I'll go you," Martin answered, attempting to pay for the current Scotch and soda with the last change from his two dollars and seeing the waiter bullied by Brissenden into putting that change back on the table.
"Why, the Scotch tunes are just like a scolding, nagging woman," Bartle went on, without deigning to notice Mr.
"Impossible!" cried the king, "the Scotch sell their king for two hundred thousand pounds!
the Scotch," he exclaimed, "the Scotch I called `my faithful,' to whom I trusted myself when I could have fled to Oxford!
In a year from the date of her illness, the frail little child of the old days at Greenwater Broad had ripened, in the bracing Scotch air and the healthy mode of life, into a comely young woman.
The Scotch friends were willing and kind; but they had domestic claims on them, and they had no money to spare.
I got up again from the sofa, strong in a daring resolution which the Scotch Verdict had suddenly kindled in me--a resolution at once too sacred and too desperate to be confided, in the first instance, to any other than my husband's ear.
"Do not cross the marsh," continued Monk: "you will have money in your pocket, and there are in the marsh some Scotch ambuscaders I have placed there.
(London, 1868.) What Sir Patrick says professionally of Scotch Marriages in this chapter is taken from this high authority.
What ship comes sailing home from India, and what English lady is this, married to a growling old Scotch Croesus with great flaps of ears?
No doubt the old cheery publicity is a little embarrassing to the two most concerned, and the old marriage customs, the singing of the bride and bridegroom to their nuptial couch, the frank jests, the country horse-play, must have fretted the souls of many a lover before Shelley, who, it will be remembered, resented the choral celebrations of his Scotch landlord and friends by appearing at his bedroom door with a brace of pistols.
To this end I left the more frequented regions, the wooded valleys, the corn-fields, and the meadow-lands, and proceeded to mount the steep acclivity of Wildfell, the wildest and the loftiest eminence in our neighbourhood, where, as you ascend, the hedges, as well as the trees, become scanty and stunted, the former, at length, giving place to rough stone fences, partly greened over with ivy and moss, the latter to larches and Scotch fir-trees, or isolated blackthorns.
But he kind of got a grip on the Hot Scotches, and stood still for a minute, thinking.