scolding


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  • noun

Synonyms for scolding

ticking-off

Synonyms

Synonyms for scolding

words expressive of strong disapproval

Synonyms for scolding

References in periodicals archive ?
In this regard, psychologist Dr MA Mohit Kamal, associate professor of National Mental Health Institute and Research, blames the parents saying scolding, yelling, and hostility towards their children show a lack of faith and may provoke rebellion.
He dismissed suggestions on social media that Baru, who is also Works Minister, and his supporters would leave PKR to form a Sarawak-based party or join existing local parties in retaliation to the scolding.
They said the two men tortured the teacher for beating and scolding a grade nine student identified as Muhammad Anas.
Ms Scolding said in her opening statement: "The church is the established church of England - the national church.
KARACHI -- Sindh Assembly proceedings were as usual filled with jokes and scolding on Wednesday as well.
Shortly after that, the secretary heard another woman shouting and scolding the dyer.
My first memory of Abbottabad Cantonment is being woken up with a jolt by the sound of a scolding. Now, being woken up with a jolt by the sound of a scolding wasn't an anomaly for an eight-year-old back then, but this time there was a difference.
It's not Labor Day yet but more candidates are announcing legislative runs, state attorneys get a scolding over not paying the other side in redistricting litigation and a new trial is ordered for Mauricio Celis - all that and more in the latest issue of our subscriber-only newsletter for political insiders ($).
Parents too feel that scolding or reprimanding kids should be avoided " Kids should be explained about the drawbacks.
Consider this letter a scolding directed to the guilty.
"He said he couldn't bear the pain of his father scolding him that way.
Editors Scolding and Gordon (clinical neuroscience, U.
In chapters five and six, she focuses specifically on the predominantly female crime of scolding. No official definition of scolding existed; apparently the crime never appears in English medieval statute law.