scapegoat


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Synonyms for scapegoat

blame

Synonyms

Synonyms for scapegoat

one who is made an object of blame

Synonyms for scapegoat

someone who is punished for the errors of others

Synonyms

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References in classic literature ?
Oftentimes, indeed, by the persistent loading of the dice against the villains and scapegoats, the reader's sympathy is half aroused in their behalf.
The scapegoat may also need reminding right now that it is among the most magnificent of its species and quite the most charismatic thereof.
I firmly believe black players who were no doubt upset by what went on in Madrid were looking for a scapegoat, and David Sullivan was wrongly made that scapegoat.
Frame specialist Roy Irlam has made a replica surround for Holman Holt's painting The Scapegoat because the original is too fragile.
THE American company at the centre of the THG drugs scandal has accused British sprinter Dwain Chambers of using them as a "scapegoat" following his own positive test for the banned steroid.
AXED Stranraer striker Ian Harty claimed last night he is being made a scapegoat.
Speaking earlier this year Mr Faber, 53, who worked as a social worker for 25 years said, ``I believe I have been made a scapegoat by the council.''
Morrison indirectly comments on this process of acknowledging the existence of a national racial division followed by a subtle denial of responsibility for it when she characterizes Pecola Breedlove, a child who is the product of what Moynihan would certainly term a pathological family, as a scapegoat. It is clear from her description that Morrison intends the scapegoating of this one young girl as a microcosm of the larger scapegoating process (7) necessary for the bolstering of a narrative of national innocence.
According to the Biblical story, the term scapegoat originates in the ancient ritual in which a goat was sent into the desert to symbolically atone for the sins of the Israelites (Leviticus, 16:8-17; New International Version).
What is normally meant when someone is described as a scapegoat is that the person is being blamed for something more than he or she deserves and that some blame could or should in all fairness be directed at others.
To maintain their autonomy, a sense of collectivity and cohesion, plus some level of public accountability, the professions every now and then identify and persecute scapegoats. Drawing on religious discourse, Daniel identifies the social location of the scapegoat as an individual at the centre of some crisis, and as a consequence their career, sometimes livelihood and certainly membership of the profession, is sacrificed for the greater good; that is, a reaffirmation of the community's values, status and the sanctity of the collectivity.
THE Salvation Army has marched to the rescue of soccer scapegoat David Beckham.
Expulsion and the Nineteenth-Century Novel: The Scapegoat in English Realist Fiction.
His 'scapegoat' icon of what is rejected within consensual tradition is singularly striking, but it is also ambiguous.
It is not a new question, and Heyns's approach to an answer is not new either: indeed, he ingenuously proposes his indebtedness to Rene Girard's The Scapegoat. It is Heyns's chief purpose to carry Girard's arguments into the field, as it were, where they will not only facilitate some closely conducted analyses but be themselves subject to analysis.