scam

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Synonyms for scam

Synonyms for scam

References in periodicals archive ?
We want New Zealanders armed with the tools they need to avoid being scammed so the internet feels like a safe space,' says Kai Fong.
KCALC chief executive Nick Whittingham said: "Being scammed can ruin people's finances.
Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum, a keynote speaker, said her office received 50,000 phone calls last year from people who believed they had been scammed. More than 100 cases were opened for formal investigations, she said.
The poll found the realistic nature of the scams was the top reason for people falling for them, and seven per cent of those who reported being scammed lost more than pounds 4,000.
Coinciding with the Office of Fair Trading's scams awareness month, the council is asking people to post emails, letters, deceptive prize draws and get-rich-quick schemes to help OFT prevent others from being scammed.
Even a couple of Worcester police officers have been scammed.
If you think you've been scammed by a business opportunity or work-at-home offer, it's possible to get your money back.
"We estimate that only five to eight per cent of victims report being scammed and despite having a campaign like National Scams Awareness month every year, we are still witnessing horrific cases such as this one.
Older people, who are scammed - either by dodgy doorstep traders, scam mail, telephone or internet scams, lose an average of PS1,200 each.
"We reported on a pensioner who lost pounds 40,000 to various lottery scams, and we are aware of another resident who has lost nearly pounds 30,000 on a fraud believing they had won something on the Spanish lottery before realising they had been scammed."
Being scammed is devastating and traumatic at any time of year, but it's at Christmas, when people need the money most, that it hits hardest."
Generally, several factors go into a successful con: (1) you're roped in by someone you know or a resource you trust, (2) there is a sense of urgency, so you have little time to investigate the opportunity, (3) the opportunity is so new or innovative that there is no information on it to be researched, (4) it sounds exciting, (5) the investment is a cash cow that is only available to a select few (so you're made to feel special as a participant), and (6) once scammed, you're too embarrassed to tell others or report it to the authorities.