sauce

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Synonyms for sauce

dressing

Synonyms for sauce

Words related to sauce

References in classic literature ?
She had a light-hearted remembrance of the failure of her sauce.
It is extremely improbable that a stream so small as the Sauce then was, should traverse the entire width of the continent; and indeed, if it were the residue of a large river, its waters, as in other ascertained cases, would be saline.
In the morning, having fairly scudded before the gale, we arrived by the middle of the day at the Sauce posta.
They were at least ten leagues from the Sauce posta, and since the murder committed by the Indians, twenty from another.
The case is different with the giant thistle (with variegated leaves) of the Pampas, for I met with it in the valley of the Sauce.
The poor Cat felt very weak, and he was able to eat only thirty-five mullets with tomato sauce and four portions of tripe with cheese.
This great man, as is well known to all lovers of polite eating, begins at first by setting plain things before his hungry guests, rising afterwards by degrees as their stomachs may be supposed to decrease, to the very quintessence of sauce and spices.
The Tatar, recollecting that it was Stepan Arkadyevitch's way not to call the dishes by the names in the French bill of fare, did not repeat them after him, but could not resist rehearsing the whole menus to himself according to the bill:--"Soupe printaniere, turbot, sauce Beaumarchais, poulard a l'estragon, macedoine de fruits.
Stay, take some sauce," he said, holding back Levin's hand as it pushed away the sauce.
Levin obediently helped himself to sauce, but would not let Stepan Arkadyevitch go on with his dinner.
Sabin helped himself to fish, and made a careful examination of the sauce.
After all," he said meditatively, "I am not sure that I was wise in insisting upon a sauce piquante.
Don't sauce ME, in the wicious pride of your youth,' Mr Venus retorts pathetically.
To which Mr Venus only replies, shaking his shock of dusty hair, and winking his weak eyes, 'Don't sauce ME, in the wicious pride of your youth; don't hit ME, because you see I'm down.
But Pickwick, gentlemen, Pickwick, the ruthless destroyer of this domestic oasis in the desert of Goswell Street-- Pickwick who has choked up the well, and thrown ashes on the sward--Pickwick, who comes before you to-day with his heartless tomato sauce and warming-pans--Pickwick still rears his head with unblushing effrontery, and gazes without a sigh on the ruin he has made.