satirize


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Synonyms for satirize

Synonyms for satirize

References in periodicals archive ?
By taunting the pretentious "magnifico" that he could never match the grandeur of Oberon's table, Browne uses the fairy banquet to satirize the inadequacies of the Spanish court, specifically denigrating Spanish attempts to impress Charles at Madrid in 1623.
Unlike Duchampian mockery, camp has an affectionate regard for what it satirizes. In this context, popular culture, with its kitsch and cliches, is as worthy of attention as the old masters of art and literature.
Schnabel's self-conscious, intermittently beautiful movie about Basquiat's rapid rise and fall seemed prompted as much by the painter-turned-director's desire to satirize the seductive and treacherous '80s art world as by his interest in Samo's psychological disintegration.
DRVAR - 17.00 - Participants of USAID project re:Generation will hold a stand-up performance which satirizes ruling stereotypes and patterns of behavior toward the other and different.
Appel satirizes jingoism in the decade following tragedy through the slings and arrows that rain on his main character.
Tatsuya Kusuhara's physical/theater troupe APE satirizes Japanese business culture.
The story line satirizes criminal behavior (a crime is defined by the state) to include organized religion as a subcategory of crime.
The four-page newsletter satirizes the Village of Rhinebeck, N.
can be anything it wants to be." The same is true of African Americans, who need not conform to anyone's stereotypes or notions of "authenticity." Indeed, toward the end of his study, Dickson-Carr says that Toni Morrison, "like Wallace Thurman and Ralph Ellison before her, satirizes the concept of African Americans ...
Among the institutions Boll satirizes is the Roman Catholic church.
KAUFMAN </IR> and <IR> EDNA FERBER </IR> , satirizes the foibles of a family of actors not dissimilar to the Barrymores.
Yesterday's installment of "Day by Day" (http://www.daybydaycartoon.com/2007/04/26/) -- Chris Muir's self-syndicated strip -- satirizes Clinton's efforts to win African-American votes as she seeks the Democratic nomination for president.
The narrative references Godard's Contempt (1963), a film that satirizes the medium and also features an iconic building, the famous Casa Malaparte, further emphasizing the repetitiveness of human events.
Throughout the novel, Rushdie satirizes and celebrates American consumerism, showing us the wonder and absurdity of the "late capitalism" we take for granted as Americans.