rose


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Related to rose: Rose color
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Synonyms for rose

References in classic literature ?
"For a red rose?" they cried; "how very ridiculous!" and the little Lizard, who was something of a cynic, laughed outright.
"Give me a red rose," she cried, "and I will sing you my sweetest song."
"One red rose is all I want," cried the Nightingale, "only one red rose!
He worked unconsciously, thinking, typically, not of Rose's reaction to this new life, but of what it held in store for himself.
Through the open door he observed that Rose was sweeping.
"This is 'The Song of Songs," he smiled, "and there is my Rose of Sharon.
But Ariadne Blish was the worst failure of all, for Rose could not bear the sight of her, and said she was so like a wax doll she longed to give her a pinch and see if she would squeak.
They said nothing to Rose about their plan for this Saturday afternoon, but let her alone till the time came for the grand surprise, little dreaming that the odd child would find pleasure for herself in a most unexpected quarter.
Rose laughed also, and, forgetting her woes, jumped up, saying eagerly
Soon they grew accustomed to the two walking into chapel arm in arm or strolling round the precincts in conversation; wherever one was the other could be found also, and, as though acknowledging his proprietorship, boys who wanted Rose would leave messages with Carey.
When the last day of term came he and Rose arranged by which train they should come back, so that they might meet at the station and have tea in the town before returning to school.
In order to be sure of meeting Rose at the station he took an earlier train than he usually did, and he waited about the platform for an hour.
Rose had been very pale from the moment of his entrance; but that might have been the effect of her recent illness.
'You should, indeed,' replied Rose. 'Forgive me for saying so, but I wish you had.'
Rose, Rose, to know that you were passing away like some soft shadow, which a light from above, casts upon the earth; to have no hope that you would be spared to those who linger here; hardly to know a reason why you should be; to feel that you belonged to that bright sphere whither so many of the fairest and the best have winged their early flight; and yet to pray, amid all these consolations, that you might be restored to those who loved you--these were distractions almost too great to bear.