roads


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Synonyms for roads

a partly sheltered anchorage

References in classic literature ?
I determined to stroll home in the purer air by the most roundabout way I could take; to follow the white winding paths across the lonely heath; and to approach London through its most open suburb by striking into the Finchley Road, and so getting back, in the cool of the new morning, by the western side of the Regent's Park.
There are a good many roads here," observed the shaggy man, turning slowly around, like a human windmill.
Yes, but he didn't say anything about shaking him up over forty miles of rough road," the other protested.
My wife," said Defarge aloud, addressing Madame Defarge: "I have travelled certain leagues with this good mender of roads, called Jacques.
The reader will be pleased to remember, that we left Mr Jones, in the beginning of this book, on his road to Bristol; being determined to seek his fortune at sea, or rather, indeed, to fly away from his fortune on shore.
She had often been, with her mistress, to visit some connections, in the little village of T , not far from the Ohio river, and knew the road well.
No automobile as yet had ventured their perilous roads.
The Widow Steavens rode up from her farm eight miles down the Black Hawk road.
The road for the French from Vienna to Znaim was shorter and better than the road for the Russians from Krems to Znaim.
This road doesn't give him a chance--it's too snowy,' said Vasili Andreevich, who prided himself on his good horse.
By half past eight, when the Deputation was destroyed, there may have been a crowd of three hundred people or more at this place, besides those who had left the road to approach the Martians nearer.
We may long have left the golden road behind, but its memories are the dearest of our eternal possessions; and those who cherish them as such may haply find a pleasure in the pages of this book, whose people are pilgrims on the golden road of youth.
MY curiosity, in a sense, was stronger than my fear, for I could not remain where I was, but crept back to the bank again, whence, sheltering my head behind a bush of broom, I might command the road before our door.
Up this road from the precincts of the city two persons were walking rapidly, as if unconscious of the trying ascent--unconscious through preoccupation and not through buoyancy.
The road I was tramping at the moment was somewhat desolate.