retrace

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References in periodicals archive ?
Almost 80 years after the first 'Kindertransport' evacuations of Jewish children to safety in Britain, 42 people set off on Sunday on a memorial bike ride that will retrace their journey from Berlin to London.
Using personal photos, letters and other documents, the Swedish writer delves into his Jewish roots and retraces camps continue to haunt him as he struggles to build a new life in a new country.
More than one million people lost their lives in Britain during the Great War, and in this hour long special, Rolf Harris and Kirsty Wark retrace their relatives' steps to discover their family stories.
The voyage retraces the slave "triangle", which saw European merchants export goods to West Africa, where they would be exchanged for slaves.
In 1953 birder Roger Tory Peterson and British naturalist James Fisher journeyed for a hundred days covering some thirty thousand miles around North America, noting their discoveries in WILD AMERICA: here on the 50th anniversary of their trip naturalist Scott Weidensaul retraces their steps and tells of his findings in RETURN TO WILD AMERICA: A YEARLONG SEARCH FOR THE CONTINENT'S NATURAL SOUL.
With a well-worn copy of the 1953 classic Wild America in hand, Weidensaul retraces the route taken by its famed authors, naturalist Roger Tory Peterson and James Fisher.
Caracciolo, however unwittingly, retraces the development of gesturalism from the free play of what post-Freudian theorist Anton Ehrenzweig calls nongestalt form(lessness) through more formally controlled imagery to a final stage of gestalt-form(alization) and system(ization).
Mumbling gibberish, they move in packs, stamping their feet rhythmically as Toshiko Oiwa sprints onstage, as if with dire news, then retraces her steps repeatedly in an ebb and flow.
He retraces the debates over women's involvement in theater before Shakespeare's time, and the extent to which during his era they appeared in dances or masques at court and in public entertainment.
Author Clinton Cox retraces the distressing legacy that many, if not all, Buffalo Soldiers confronted in protecting white settlers during the late 1880s.