reticence


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  • noun

Synonyms for reticence

Synonyms for reticence

the keeping of one's thoughts and emotions to oneself

reserve in speech, behavior, or dress

Synonyms for reticence

the trait of being uncommunicative

References in classic literature ?
His reticence was not entirely the shoddy article that a business life promotes, the reticence that pretends that nothing is something, and hides behind the DAILY TELEGRAPH.
With reticence and modesty present, I could never have dared tell Scotty my small-boat estimate of him.
Followed as he followed it, with a skilful reticence, in a kind of social chiaroscuro, it was still possible for the polite to call him a professional painter.
Perhaps they thought that our means were too modest for them, and, therefore, unworthy of politeness or reticence.
He thought the adieux of Montague and Ada Dyas as fine as anything he had ever seen Croisette and Bressant do in Paris, or Madge Robertson and Kendal in London; in its reticence, its dumb sorrow, it moved him more than the most famous histrionic outpourings.
Philip wondered whether there was in him really anything: his reticence, the haggard look of him, the pungent humour, seemed to suggest personality, but might be no more than an effective mask which covered nothing.
But she had determined that there was no reason why he should suffer if her reticence were the cause of his suffering.
The Duchess liked to understand everything, and her husband's reticence annoyed her.
Not alone because of the privacy and holiness of the subject, but because of what might have been prudery in the middle class, but which in them was the modesty and reticence found in individuals of the working class when they strive after clean living and morality.
Dunfer's mouth and the mysterious reticence of his manner, and to the mingled hardihood and tenderness of his sole literary production--the epitaph.
The paradox that makes this technique work is that reticence is a kind of silence that implies a simultaneous conversation, an absence of words implying the presence of words.
People see in the inner fashions a spirit of guarded reticence through which natural instincts struggled for expression, inhibited by a traditional attitude of mind.
She attributes the early reticence regarding her important abstinence message to the desire of organization officials to avoid controversy.
Donald shows the reticence of Lincoln to open up to anyone, stemming from his childhood in the American frontier through to his political life in Washington DC.
Second, Zuckert seems unwilling to draw his readers' attention to the debate in Congress regarding this passage and the reticence of delegates to rest American rights on a naturalistic rather than a historical foundation.