rentier


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Words related to rentier

someone whose income is from property rents or bond interest and other investments

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References in periodicals archive ?
In this context, rentier capitalism is a mask for rentierism invented by the owners of E&P technologies to blur the visibility of surplus appropriation in the oil sector.
When money solidifies, that is when it stops circulating, some types such as the notaire or the rentier come into being as the products of this petrifaction.
Section I presents the introduction to the paper while section II reexamines the theory of the rentier state.
Political Economy Explanations of the Resource Curse: Rentier State and Rent-seeking Models
The enclave rentier economy results in a clan-based ruling class which 'confounds' public and private ownership: what's 'state' is actually absolutist monarchs and their extended families at the top and their client tribal leader, political entourage and technocrats in the middle.
Chipkin mines the city's origins in a virtuoso tour through politics, theory, art, life and language itself, introducing words from the French lexicon which became irreplaceable in describing this city: speculator, careerist, rentier, profiteer, entrepreneur.
HRH also talked of the importance of humanizing globalization to develop a global understanding that goes beyond rentier investments and that highlights the human face of various issues of security, economy and culture - calling for dialogue within civil society which takes into account the cultural diversity of peoples and the meeting of minds.
Abu Dhabi can be described as a strong rentier state due to its vast fossil-fuel resources, small national population (estimated at 20 percent of a total population of 1.
As a result, Angola, a country that overtook Nigeria in 2008 as Africa's leading oil producer, is chiefly a rentier economy, dependent entirely on multinationals for externally supplied income derived from liquidated natural capital such as oil and diamonds.
A rentier is a person whose income is derived solely from the ownership of capital, rather than from one's own labor.
Or suppose a London rentier in 1880 bought bonds for a proposed railroad from Buenos Aires deep into the grasslands of Argentina.
The influence of rentier economies predicated on rent revenues development on institutions is also extensively researched in (Chaudhry 1997, and Karl 1997).
It details the country's historical and religious background, its oil rentier economy and its international role, showing how they interact to create the dynamics of the contemporary Saudi state.
Some call this perpetual-motion machine a "post-industrial economy," but it might more accurately be called a rentier economy.
Most Arab regimes function as rentier states--governments that don't need to ask much of their citizenry because of oil revenues and the like.