reasonable


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  • adj

Synonyms for reasonable

Synonyms for reasonable

consistent with reason and intellect

kept within sensible limits

not excessive or extreme in amount, degree, or force

suited to or within the means of ordinary people

Synonyms for reasonable

showing reason or sound judgment

not excessive or extreme

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marked by sound judgment

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References in classic literature ?
You exhausted all reasonable means of discovery when they went away.
``Barely,'' said Gurth, though the sum demanded was more reasonable than he expected, ``and it will leave my master nigh penniless.
``Seventy-one seventy-two; thy master is a good youth seventy-three, an excellent youth seventy-four that piece hath been clipt within the ring seventy-five and that looketh light of weight seventy-six when thy master wants money, let him come to Isaac of York seventy-seven that is, with reasonable security.'' Here he made a considerable pause, and Gurth had good hope that the last three pieces might escape the fate of their comrades; but the enumeration proceeded.
In most of these cases, the court's decision was predicated on a finding that the police lacked probable cause or reasonable grounds to believe that their entry or subsequent search was necessary to respond to an emergency situation.
17, 2001 and will be deemed to have reasonable cause for such late filing.
(p) (1) Publicly available information means any information that you have a reasonable basis to believe is lawfully made available to the general public from:
Are we delivering on our promises of improved access, more reasonable cost, and more dependable health care services?" Too many answer "No." One reason is the failure to use a powerful tool, ethical reasoning.
THE GUIDELINES IMPOSE THE EQUIVALENT of the "reasonable woman" standard (as opposed to the generic "reasonable person" standard).
Section 504 regulations were written under the assumption that (1) persons with disabilities can be tested in such a way that their scores do not reflect the effects of their disability and (2) resulting test scores, when provided reasonable accommodations, are comparable to those of nonhandicapped persons (Sherman & Robinson, 1982).
Because the past 10 years have seen advances in technology, including social technology, that have increased the productivity and employability of people with mental retardation who heretofore have been discounted, we have a new depth of understanding about how to provide "reasonable accommodation." This understanding can be used to implement the employment title of ADA in nontraditional work settings, including those workplaces covered by ADA but not by Section 504.
If all the considerable bend in the Canadian legal system was to be reduced to one word, that single word would be "reasonable." Legislators, law students, lawyers and judges all know they can safely qualify what they intend to communicate by inserting the word "reasonable" in their legislation, exam answers, written and oral submissions and judicial decisions.
The penalty does not apply, however, if the failure was due to reasonable cause (sometimes with the additional condition that the failure was not due to willful disregard).
In this first monograph on judicial treatment of reasonable expectations of the policyholder or of the insured, the author argues for an incremental but definite acceptance of the conception of policyholderAEs reasonable expectations in English insurance law.
CANADIAN CRIMINAL LAW DISTINGUISHES between the thresholds of "reasonable suspicion" and "reasonable grounds to believe" required in order for police officers to lawfully arrest persons, conduct certain forms of searches, and to obtain warrants.
Casey Martin case, the Supreme Court established three tests to determine ADA compliance: (1) whether the requested modification is reasonable; (2) whether it is necessary for the individual, and (3) whether it would fundamentally alter the nature of the competition.